FanDuel - WFBC

January 18, 2006

NBA brawl in the stands repeated: Or something else? New York Knick Antonio Davis ran into the stands during a game in Chicago, claiming his wife's safety was being threatened. Larry Brown supported him, immediately drawing a distinction between what happened last night and what happened that fateful day last year at the Palace, saying "That thing that happened in the stands had nothing to do with the two teams. That's a man concerned about his family." Regardless, this incident underscores the weak, often ineffective security at sports venues around the country.

posted by insomnyuk to basketball at 11:15 PM - 82 comments

I witnessed my wife being threatened by a man that I learned later to be intoxicated," Davis said in a statement issued after the game. "I saw him touch her, and I know I should not have acted the way I did, but I would have felt terrible if I didn't react. There was no time to call security. It happened too quickly." I see nothing wrong with his reaction.. Whatever he witnessed took his mind totally off the game, an overtime thriller, sent him hurdling over the scorers table and up ten rows of seats. Instead of losing it and cold-cocking the fan, he assessed the situation and handled it accordingly. The dude showed a lot of class and that he won't put up with any shananigans.

posted by chrisly13 at 01:00 AM on January 19

The man was going up to protect his family. It wasn't a Malice in the Palace type of thing where fans were throwing beer and swinging fists and the players were slugging fans. He went into the stands, remained calm, and protected his wife until security got there. Then he went back to his bench, again stayed calm and did not throw fists at folks or go crazy. Davis did what he had to do. The refs played by the book and ejected him. The NBA will probably fine/suspend him. But he protected his family, that's what counts.

posted by roberts at 04:59 AM on January 19

Again a confontation between players and fans starts with alchol. When will the league learn that it needs to be limited during games? Just a point of view from the coach.

posted by coach at 06:36 AM on January 19

David Stern should look at this for what it was . Davis did the right thing and no man should be punished for protecting his family . That fans picture should be posted at all NBA venues and he should be banned from NBA games for life . I applaud Mr. Davis and would hope that David Stern does as well . There should be a alcohol limit at games as ell as heightened security .

posted by alvinthefirst at 07:04 AM on January 19

What a moronic headline. This incident had no similarities to last years infamous episode.

posted by mjkredliner at 07:47 AM on January 19

Increasing stadium security is never going to eliminate the possibility of fans being idiots. Other possible solutions: 1) No alchohol sales. 2) hockey-style plexiglass around the court (although in this case, Davis's wife would have had no help) 3) No NBA in the midwest

posted by Bill Lumbergh at 08:10 AM on January 19

No NBA in the midwest That's a bit of a generalization, dontcha think? I was unaware that incidents at NBA games were localized to the Midwest.

posted by willthrill72 at 08:17 AM on January 19

That's a bit of a generalization, dontcha think? I suppose you're right about that - it was meant to be sarcastic and a little bit of a joke. I'm aware of fan/player problems all over the U.S.

posted by Bill Lumbergh at 08:23 AM on January 19

Sorry, Bill. It's early and I haven't had my requisite coffee yet. I promise, my sense of humor will return shortly.

posted by willthrill72 at 08:26 AM on January 19

Mjkredliner, the headline was immediately contradicted by the rest of the post, or were you too lazy to continue reading?

posted by insomnyuk at 08:32 AM on January 19

I see nothing wrong with his reaction. I do. After last year's incident in Detroit, players have to know that they must never charge headlong into the stands. A 6-foot-9 athlete running 10 rows up into a group of fans could easily lead to another riot, causing a lot of people to get hurt, including his wife and anyone else accompanying her to the game. He's fortunate that some idiot in the stands didn't throw a punch, which would have undoubtedly led to another ugly brawl. Davis should be suspended for a few games to reinforce the message that players do not belong in the stands for any reason.

posted by rcade at 08:43 AM on January 19

Steve Kerr thinks Antonio Davis was wrong and will probably get a 3 game suspension. Kerr says, "the player has to quickly point out the situation to security and trust that other fans in the area will come to the aid of any person who is being threatened." Oh man, is he apologizing for Chicago fans? How can he honestly say that with a straight face when many security guards are overweight or out of shape? At that late stage why should Davis have put his faith in security guards? He had implicitly trusted them to provide a safe venue by allowing his wife to attend the game in Chicago, and they couldn't even do that, so why the hell would he have just tried to call security to act from the bench? I don't think Kerr has a leg to stand on. At some point he felt that his wife was no longer safe and jumped into the stands. If time was critical, calling security over to the bench, explaining the situation, and then waiting for more security to show up before they waded into the stands would probably take far too long. Besides, Antonio Davis is 6'9" and a professional athlete, he probably could have lapped the security guards on the way up the stands to his wife. Ultimately he is responsible for the safety of his family, and if something had happened to her because he just stood at the team bench, only ten rows away, calling for security, he might not have been suspended but he would be hated for being a coward. I understand David Stern and the NBA are trying to crack down on players running into the stands, but it seems they are treating the symptoms and not the cause. A simple zero-tolerance policy is boorish and unsubtle. Hopefully Stern will take a more nuanced approach. Previous posters have mentioned alcohol as a key to many of these problems. Even if they don't sell alcohol at all, people will just come to games drunk or sneak in flasks. Besides, arenas care too much about profit margins to keep drunk people away from sporting events. I was at a Bengals game a few years ago in the nosebleeds. There was a section-clearing brawl, and it was Bengals fans fighting other Bengals fans who ultimately started it, and got kicked out. State troopers cleared them out with batons, man. Did Paul Brown Stadium change it's alcohol policy? No. Unfortunately, only a major incident and ensuing insurance premiums and coverage requirements will probably be the catalyst for any change - like a permanent injury or death.

posted by insomnyuk at 08:45 AM on January 19

"Again a confontation between players and fans starts with alchol. When will the league learn that it needs to be limited during games?"

Banned (as Bill said) maybe, but "limited"? It's not as if the folks working the concession stand are experienced bartenders; they can barely count out change let alone be able to tell if someone's had too much to drink (apologies to any concession stand workers - it's just a joke). Plus, alcohol bannination woule be a revenue killer for owners (+$6 beers!), which we all know is a big no-no.

On preview, rcade, agreed and, yeah, what imsonyuk said.

posted by redsnare at 08:47 AM on January 19

I hate that correlations are being made between this incident and what happened in Indiana last year. I applaud Antonio Davis for showing restraint and finding out the situation before wildly throwing haymakers. I think if security had been paying more attention, this could have been stopped before it was a news story. Davis did what he had to do. The refs played by the book and ejected him. The NBA will probably fine/suspend him. But he protected his family, that's what counts. I totally agree. I'm sure Davis knew what he was doing was wrong when he was doing it, but it's a small price to pay to ensure the safety of your family. The officials did what they had to do and I wouldn't be suprised if Davis DOESN'T appeal his suspension.

posted by woody1090 at 08:59 AM on January 19

How about: Reserving a section for players families, and supplying it with requisite security in all venues, mandated by the league? Give security the authority to remove hecklers . Is it that hard?

posted by mjkredliner at 09:00 AM on January 19

Even if they don't sell alcohol at all, people will just come to games drunk or sneak in flasks. I agree that banning alcohol sales won't do a thing. Ever been to been to a major college football game and sat in the student section? I dunno about elsewhere, but down at UGA, lack of alcohol sales sure as hell doesn't stop people from a) coming in plastered (especially night games), b) bringing in flask(s), or c, all of the above. Actually, it's one of the reasons I wasn't as thrilled about going to football games my senior year; every one in the student section tended to be obnoxiously drunk.

posted by jmd82 at 09:07 AM on January 19

How can he honestly say that with a straight face when many security guards are overweight or out of shape? If this is true, then it's something Davis knew before the game. (I have trouble believing courtside security is lax after what happened last year, as people are assuming in this discussion.) If Davis didn't trust security to attend to the safety of his family, that's something to deal with before something happens. He's the president of the NBA Players Association, according to another article, so he's in a perfect position to do something about that situation. He also admits he did the wrong thing.

posted by rcade at 09:11 AM on January 19

woody 1090..the brawl did not happen in Indiana. It was in the Detroit. Indiana fans are not that stupid.

posted by sam845 at 09:11 AM on January 19

No surprise that Steve Kerr would get security to help. What's he gonna do?

posted by Bill Lumbergh at 09:20 AM on January 19

rcade: then I would like to think that there is probably more to the story and Antonio's wife wasn't truly in danger. Was there some pre-existing beef between him and someone in the stands?

posted by insomnyuk at 09:28 AM on January 19

from the article rcade linked: "I saw him touch her, and I know I should not have acted the way I did, but I would have felt terrible if I didn't react. There was no time to call security. It happened too quickly." - Antonio Davis

posted by insomnyuk at 09:39 AM on January 19

While I agree there is no comparison between this situation and the one in Detroit, I still have a big problem with a player going into the stands for any reason. Any player can go into the crown with the best, most noble of intentions, but the other several thousand people don't know, don't care (or both) what the situation is and may use it as a chance to start a full-out riot. All it takes is a few dozen individuals to react adversely to the player running up there, and the situation is automatically out of control. Soon other players are coming up, coaches, trainers, security, fans with good intentions, etc. The problem with the league increasing security at games ultimately results in the same problem, in their minds, that either eliminating or curtailing alcohol sales involves: Money. There's really no way of eliminating this type of occurance, but stiff, stiff fines, etc. for those involved always help.

posted by dyams at 09:42 AM on January 19

This incident is being blown way out of porportion. Davis shouldnt have gone into the stands, but I can see why he did. I would have down the same thing and I am over wieght and use oxygen! I think that twoo many people are trying to make this out to be like the riot last year. It was far from it.

posted by daddisamm at 09:57 AM on January 19

The NBA is taking this whole thing out of proportion. He obviously did what any loving husband or relative would have done...hopefully. He took it easier on the guy than I would have. II would have beat the crap out of him drunk or nnot. Thats just me. holla back.

posted by pimpenseasyas123 at 10:06 AM on January 19

This incident is being blown way out of porportion. I don't agree. Just because a riot didn't ensue may just be dumb luck. Have the same exact situation take place on a different night, in a different city, it blows up completely. There's just no possible way to take the pulse of thousands of on-lookers when something like this transpires. This time it ended without something major. Next time may result in people getting beaten, stabbed, whatever. It's a volatile situation any way you cut it.

posted by dyams at 10:07 AM on January 19

could easily lead to another riot may use it as a chance to start a full-out riot yeah, those wild NBA fans may start rioting ... 'cause they're like crazy thugs in the lower level seats... seriously, have you guys actually been to an NBA game??? I mean the chance of player, who's not throwing punches, going into the stands and starting a riot is zilch ... Doesn't anybody notice this? I feel like I'm taking crazy pills!

posted by Mike McD at 10:09 AM on January 19

I agree about the situation getting out of control if players go in to the stands, but in the "real world," I can't picture a husband/wife thinking about the danger or consequences before trying to protect their wife/husband in a bad situation. Therefore, I don't think Davis was really thinking about how dangerous he could've made the situation. But, ideally, a professional basketball game is more of a controlled environment than the "real world." I don't think banning alcohol will solve the problem. That brings a whole set of problems with people arriving intoxicated or sneaking it in. There is more malice and hostility in those two effects. JMD82 said it well too. If they ban alcohol, people will make a point to be even more obnoxiously drunk than they would've gotten at the game, because they don't agree with the rule. Yeah, and why can't they reserve a section just for player's families? Maybe there is something about this that won't work that I'm missing...

posted by saint_eagle24 at 10:12 AM on January 19

I think Davis did exactly what most men are taught to do from childhood: protect those we love. Whether it's right or wrong as a legal or league issue is irrelevant to me. This is a man who saw a confrontation between a stranger and his wife...with his kids looking on...and did what he had to do to protect her. Yes, he probably should be at least fined and possibly suspended to uphold the league rule, but I bet if it happened again he would do exactly the same and I wouldn't blame him. Sometimes there is a price to pay for what is morally correct but against the law/rules. Any word on what's happening with the "fan"?

posted by Texan_lost_in_NY at 10:15 AM on January 19

the brawl did not happen in Indiana. It was in the Detroit. Indiana fans are not that stupid. That is total bullshit, there are people all around the country who get intoxicated and do stupid things. Plus, I could say that no Piston would ever be stupid enough to lay on a scorers table, run into the stands, and start a massive brawl (not to mention all the other stupid shit Ron Artest does). NBA franchises would never ban alcohol because it is a huge source a revanue and alcohol related incidents that are game disrupting don't happen every day in every arena.

posted by Ying Yang Mafia at 10:21 AM on January 19

I can totally feel Antonio. Basketball is temporary. The love of a good woman is for life. The sale of alcohol should be discontinued. It's gotta be a problem, when a fan can't enjoy a ballgame, unless he or she is DRUNK! Whatever happened to the rule that the HOST is responsible if a guest becomes intoxicated at a function, goes out and blows head on into a family of four? Antonio, take the fine and suspension, and as you have already, own up to your actions. Go home and give your whole family one BIG HUG. See Ya!!!!

posted by pokchop at 10:33 AM on January 19

How about: Reserving a section for players families...mjkredliner I agree completely...it's not like these venues only host 1 game a year...It's the NBA's responsibility to make sure that players don't have to keep an eye on their families in the stands...so that the players can concentrate 100% on the game while entertaining the 99.5% fans that are sober...there to enjoy a basketball contest...

posted by phillyolhead at 10:46 AM on January 19

I mean the chance of player, who's not throwing punches, going into the stands and starting a riot is zilch ... You're applying reason to something that isn't rational -- why people riot. Before last year, would you have believed that dozens of people would begin brawling courtside at an NBA game because of a player/fan fight? Most of them weren't involved at all, but it didn't stop them from being idiots. Once sparked, riots take on a logic of their own.

posted by rcade at 10:48 AM on January 19

They still have professional sports in Chicago?

posted by GoBirds at 10:58 AM on January 19

Why is that the black players always have to react to EVERYTHING with violence or the threat of violence??? Davis went up there to intimidate someone and maybe hurt someone(who knows) and it could of started a brawl. He should be suspended for 10 games. When players leave the bench, they can be ejected and fined. In MLB, if players go in the stands for anything, they get suspended and fined. Note: never see any caucasian players going in the stands, do you?

posted by bluekarma at 11:04 AM on January 19

Where's RZA when we need him and yes, I'm serious.

posted by Texan_lost_in_NY at 11:37 AM on January 19

Note: never see any caucasian players going in the stands, do you? Tie Domi pulled a fan through broken glass into a penalty box. Chad Kreuter and several other Dodgers got into fistfights with fans over a stolen cap. Mike Milbury of the Boston Bruins once took off a fan's shoe and beat him with it. This has nothing to do with race, and it's vile for you to suggest otherwise.

posted by rcade at 11:41 AM on January 19

Why is that the black players always have to react to EVERYTHING with violence or the threat of violence??? Because they're sub-human sacks of shit. That's your point, right? Rhetorical questions are poorly named as they are terrible rhetorical devices. Tell you what: if you're going to continue to troll us with this shit, at least have the stones to say what you imply. Because I have a feeling you don't mean it.

posted by yerfatma at 11:44 AM on January 19

First, I want to say I whole-heartedly agree with Davis' actions. Like so many have said, when there is a threat to the safty of your family the first thought that a person should have is to come to their aid and protect them. Of course, it's most likely that he will be fined for the sake of non-tolerance in the NBA or in any other league for that matter, but with that being said... bluekarma, all I can say is wow... I can't believe that someone would make a sad attempt to turn this discussion into a racial issue. It goes without saying that that comment was very stereotypical and you should be ashamed of your self for that.

posted by exrayvision at 11:55 AM on January 19

The only white dudes that go into the stands are, as Shane Doan would say, f***ing Frenchmen.

posted by holden at 12:06 PM on January 19

Jeff Nelson in the Fenway bullpen brawl. Compare to Gary Sheffield's restraint in a similar Fenway incident.

posted by yerfatma at 12:21 PM on January 19

yeah, those wild NBA fans may start rioting ... 'cause they're like crazy thugs in the lower level seats... Where was the guy who threw the cup at Artest sitting? If you think the chances of anything happening is "zilch," then you need to wake up and join the real world. Absolutely anything is possible. If there aren't, as you call them, "crazy thugs" at NBA games, then why did this happen in the first place? They need someone like you at all NBA games, sitting on the benches, telling guys like Davis, "Don't worry, Antonio. No crazy thugs come to NBA games." If your logic was true, this guy wouldn't have been getting into it with Davis' wife, had his hands on her, etc. You're right, the overwhelming percentage of fans are absolutely fine. Take one or two or so out of 12,000 that want to create chaos or start an ugly incident, that's all it takes. I again want to restate my opinion that Davis was indeed doing what many red-blooded, chivalrous males would do, but next time, if it blows up into something out-of-control, hopefully we don't have to read through endless posts saying how everyone is shocked and surprised.

posted by dyams at 12:22 PM on January 19

if it blows up into something out-of-control, I consider it a small miracle that this thing didn't get out of control. Kudos to the rest of the fans in Chicago who didn't jump Antonio for coming into the crowd.

posted by Bill Lumbergh at 01:17 PM on January 19

Mike McD has a point. Most of the people who own the rights to the seats near the court are usually upper middle class rich folks. All the blue collar rioters are up in the rafters!!!!! On a serious note. The man has every right to stop some fan from physically harrassing his wife and children. This incident should be used to show how a true man handles a situation like this. He went into the stands and protected his family, no punches, no fights. We revere the athletes who cheat on their wives, don't pay child support, and are generally a scum bag, but we are going to suspend Davis for doing what any decent husband or father SHOULD do in that situation. This whole thing is ludacris. I applaud Davis for doing what he needed to do and doing it in an adult and professional manner.

posted by mcstan13 at 01:27 PM on January 19

I don't believe in the True Man paradigm. That shit is, uh, ludicrous, and it went out with John Wayne, if it was ever in at all. The problem here is that Antonio Davis is (in his case, seriously over-)paid to do a job, and he can't do that job if he feels he has to keep an eye on his family. A team-family section is a good idea, and so is a no-drinking section where people can sit without fear of being harassed by drunken self-entitled types sitting at courtside on their company's dime. The blue collar rioters in the rafters, I would imagine, don't brawl as often, because they know the value of their ticket, and they tend to want to stay till the end of a game, especially a game as good as that one otherwise was.

posted by chicobangs at 01:51 PM on January 19

bluekarma be very careful defending whites in this moronic filter... If you say anything thats the truth about the racial double standard it gets zapped by the sports filter gestapo

posted by maclmn at 02:17 PM on January 19

A little bit more interesting. Everyone still "applauding" the Davises?

posted by yerfatma at 02:18 PM on January 19

maclmn, I have four questions for you, as follows: 1. If it's such a "moronic filter", why are you here? 2. In what way does spouting ignorant stereotypes about African-Americans constitute "defending whites"? 3. Just what are we whites up against that we need defending? 4. About the so-called "racial double standard", when was the last time you heard someone on SportsFilter say something like, "Why is that the white players always have to react to EVERYTHING with violence or the threat of violence???" Eagerly awaiting your reply, with specific examples.

posted by lil_brown_bat at 02:31 PM on January 19

Reading the fan observations and Jay Mariotti's column, it seems like there's no way to get a straight story once people get their anger up. I have trouble believing either side's giving us a real accounting -- the part about the fan saying nothing provocative, and being forced to grab Kendra Davis' finger "because he didn’t not know what her intentions were" is weird. What did he fear she'd do with it? Did she lick it first and threaten a wet willie? Fingernails filed to razor-sharp points? be very careful defending whites in this moronic filter... Bluekarma wasn't defending whites, macmln, he was attacking blacks. As for your general insult against SportsFilter, why frequent a community you clearly despise? The web's a big place. Don't let us stop you from finding your bliss.

posted by rcade at 02:37 PM on January 19

What happened to our ignore the trolls and stupid fuckers plan, people?

posted by billsaysthis at 03:02 PM on January 19

That's a good plan, billsaysthis. Sorry. Though I'm a bit of a stupid fucker myself. Please don't hold it against me. However, feel free to ignore me. And to erase my stupider posts.

posted by Hugh Janus at 03:05 PM on January 19

As a half-breed Cherokee and Scot, I have no problem with Mr. Davis going to the defense of his wife. I don't see anything John Wayne in protecting your wife, or anyone else's wife for that matter, from abusive behavior. In light of recent events, the teams and the NBA need better security, period. That being said, if Kendra was truly the instigator in this little fracas, then Mr. Davis needs to have a very firm discussion with his wife about how to behave in public, and how that behavior can impact his career, and her life of ease.

posted by irunfromclones at 03:16 PM on January 19

From this article: For each game Davis is suspended, he would forfeit $126,045.45 in salary. Considering that he is probably looking at a 5 to 10 game suspension, I would say that, per irunfromclones' comments, Antonio's wife may well learn her lesson without any talking to from Antonio or anyone esle for that matter.

posted by holden at 03:34 PM on January 19

And now, in the finest tradition of American jurisprudence, the lawsuits are gettin' ready to fly.

posted by The_Black_Hand at 03:46 PM on January 19

If the NBA is so concerned about image, why don't they look at this as it was--a man going in the stands to protect his wife. I know it would make too much sense for the NBA to look at this matter as a separate instance and not as a memory of the Malice in the Palace fiasco.

posted by roberts at 04:40 PM on January 19

Five game, unpaid vacation for Antonio.

posted by The_Black_Hand at 04:46 PM on January 19

Soooooo, let me get this straight: * Players who contract AIDS while screwing thousands of women: role models. * Players who screw around on their wives, visit strip bars, fuck fans, et al: role models. * Players who have drug problems: role models until it impairs their on-court performance. * Players who get huled up on rape charges: role models. * Players who are concerned for the welfare of their families: suspend 'em!

posted by rodgerd at 04:50 PM on January 19

False dichotomies: priceless!

posted by yerfatma at 05:32 PM on January 19

For liability reasons the NBA must have a zero tolerance rule re: players going into the stands. If they didn't and a fan was injured by a player, the nba could be considered more negligent, and be on the hook for millions. In today's out-of-control litigation environment, this litigious Axelrod slime-bag figures the scratches to his skin and the emotional "pain and suffering" could net him tens or even hundreds of thousands in settlement money.Any time a player enters the stands misguided fans are standing by ready to cash in on the lawsuit lottery. Our country is run by greedy trial lawyers who thru their advertising have to many off us trained to call them for almost for anything resembling misfortune, even if we are primarily responsible for it.

posted by mapnut at 05:41 PM on January 19

This isn't about liability; it's about sensibility. What Davis did is the equivalent of failing to put your campfire out properly -- a minor event if nothing bad happens, but a huge honking deal if a forest burns down.

posted by rcade at 05:55 PM on January 19

22 year old son of a political operative not drunk at a sporting event? Yeah right.

posted by insomnyuk at 06:10 PM on January 19

A new video now on ESPN News shows Davis' wife leaning over a seat and talking to the fan, who never left his seat. Davis' wife seems to be telling the guy to calm down and brushes her hand on his shoulder but the guy never reaches out towards her. The complete video of the "incident" is not being shown but what is shown looks pretty harmless by both parties.

posted by Texan_lost_in_NY at 07:42 PM on January 19

This isn't about liability; it's about sensibility. What Davis did is the equivalent of failing to put your campfire out properly -- a minor event if nothing bad happens, but a huge honking deal if a forest burns down. Entirely true, and the reason Davis was suspended for five games.

posted by Ying Yang Mafia at 05:20 AM on January 20

That was well put, rcade. And I like "Huge honking deal."

posted by dyams at 07:11 AM on January 20

The short clip of this incident I saw on ESPN last night shows Axelrod sitting in his seat while Kendra Davis yelled at him and twice put her hands on him. He didn't touch her, motioning to security after she touched him a second time. He wasn't even paying close attention to her -- at one point, he peers around her to see the game. His threat to sue appears to be a ploy to get the Davises to apologize for calling him a drunk. "I could tell you that if they issued a public apology, it would go a long way towards resolving this issue," his attorney told the media. If he actually carries it out, that's a pretty lame thing to be known for -- suing an NBA player's wife because she got all up in your business.

posted by rcade at 07:24 AM on January 20

Also, as a total sidenote, the attorney Axelrod retained is a real tool! When I worked at a large financial services firm in Chicago, he would come in periodically to due business and he treated all the support staff like dog shit (and he wasn't even that big a client). When I saw the attorney on the local news (J. Paul Deratany, I believe) I nearly crapped myself. I leaned over to the wife and told her I hope Axelrod loses simply for retaining such a smug jackass. Anyway, sorry for the digression. Continue.

posted by willthrill72 at 08:39 AM on January 20

Most attorney's, when you get right down to it, are smug, tool-jackasses. They're often the best kind to win this type of case.

posted by dyams at 08:49 AM on January 20

22 year old son of a political operative not drunk at a sporting event? Yeah right. Oh, you are soooo sued. Also, as a total sidenote, the attorney Axelrod retained is a real tool! That's it...you just made the list too. Most attorney's, when you get right down to it, are smug, tool-jackasses. Holy crap, it's gonna be a busy day at the courthouse!

posted by The_Black_Hand at 01:47 PM on January 20

That's ok. I'll counter sue on behalf of my former fellow employees on basis of mental anguish and harrassment. If I could only that attorney's number....

posted by willthrill72 at 02:20 PM on January 20

I'm just glad that Fieger has an United States Prosecutor mad at him. Hopefully he won't end up as the Michigan Attorney General.

posted by Ying Yang Mafia at 04:28 PM on January 20

It's funny, but as you watch more and more of the entire clip of this event, I'm beginning to feel Axelrod was the guy in the most danger. Davis' wife looked as if she was going to claw his face off, and regardless of what was said, she appeared to be the aggressor of any major confrontation.

posted by dyams at 08:05 AM on January 21

He went into the stands to "protect his family". What a bunch of neanderthal horseshit. Davis is a dumb ass, he had no context for what was going on in the stands, where there are scores of security people, and lied about who was drunk and who had done what after the fact. What a paragon of manly virtue. Give me a break. Here's another view on the situation From Deadspin:

I’m an ex-New Yorker living in Chicago and I was at the Bulls game last night. I wanted to share a different perspective on what happened because what is being reported is not at all accurate. I was sitting less than 10 feet from Kendra Davis and saw the whole thing. The section of seats is filled with longtime season ticketholders so there are no “troublemakers” who sit there. Given that it was Eddy Curry’s first game back in Chicago since being traded, most of the seats in the section were filled by the ticketholders themselves. Throughout the game, Kendra was making a spectacle of herself. She’d stand up during the game and yell to her friends sitting behind her. The only alcohol I saw consumed in the section all night was by members of her group. When the game went into overtime, the intensity obviously increased. A fan (the balding fellow mentioned in Jay Mariotti’s column today) who was sitting two rows directly behind her, was rooting loudly for the Bulls. He did not say anything offensive. He did not swear. He was just rooting for the Bulls. It appeared that Kendra didn’t like it that someone was rooting against her husband. She got up and went to the guy’s seat (he remained seated the whole time) and started waving her hands in his face. She kept telling him to “calm down” and “relax,” and the guy kept telling her to get away from him. He was not at all confrontational. She called a member of the Bulls security staff over and told him what had happened from her perspective. He did nothing to discipline the fan since he apparently did nothing wrong. At that point, another fan sitting nearby asked her to sit down because she was obstructing his view of the game. She immediately ran over and started screaming at him, repeatedly sticking her finger in his face. He asked her to stop sticking her finger in his face, but she continued to do it and he grabbed her finger to defend himself because he didn’t not know what her intentions were. As he held her finger, she lunged at him with her other hand, and he grabbed that one to protect himself. He pushed her hands away from him, and at that point Antonio Davis arrived at his seat. There was a Bulls security person who restrained him from going after the fan. Davis was then escorted back down to the court. Security talked to a number of people and quickly determined that Kendra Davis was at fault. She and her kids were escorted from the section. The balding fellow left his seat for a short time to give his statement and returned to his seat a short time later. Nobody was ejected, nobody was arrested. From the stories I’ve read, this is not the first time she has gotten in trouble at a game (the argument with Latrell Sprewell). One of the other fans sitting in the section was from Naperville, where Davis lived while playing with the Bulls and his son played Little League baseball with Antonio Jr. (Davis’ son). He said that she was constantly making a spectacle of herself and would routinely getting into arguments with other fans and families. I hope you’ll get this side of the story out. People should know the truth about what happened. What Really Happened In The Stands? Nothing. [Deadspin]

posted by psmealey at 11:08 AM on January 21

II would have beat the crap out of him drunk or nnot. Thats just me. holla back. And you would have been wrong for doing it, AND you'd likely be serving time in jail for it. And justifiably so.

posted by psmealey at 12:14 PM on January 21

he had 2 do wat he did wat was right even if his wife is wrong davis saw his wife in trouble stern shouldnt suspend him this fucking bullshit

posted by defrag3x at 01:09 PM on January 21

hey rcade...we are talking about Basketball here! A white mans creation, and now over run with street thugs and ghetto trash! Have you seen any WHITE NBA PLAYERS go into the stands? And Ty Domi is a frenchmen..who gives a ratz tail! And who started the fiasco with the Dodgers into the stands at Wrigley field? Sheffiled I believe. And look at Milton Bradley last year! And I can suggest whatever I want because I have a right to my opinons, as do you. Don't twist me into a racist because you liberals overuse that word anyway! I am just telling it like I see it!

posted by bluekarma at 03:54 PM on January 21

and one other thing..look at all these problems listed below by rogerd.. Players who contract AIDS while screwing thousands of women: role models. * Players who screw around on their wives, visit strip bars, fuck fans, et al: role models. * Players who have drug problems: role models until it impairs their on-court performance. * Players who get huled up on rape charges: role models. * Players who are concerned for the welfare of their families: suspend 'em! Count how many instances we know of where a caucasian is guilty of any of it. Go ahead..you might count one or two, but the numbers of blacks you can count is 10 times as many. I am just saying that WHY IS THAT??????? Education? Media explotation of bad role models like AI, Shawn Kemp, T.O., artest, Magic, Dennis Rodman,..ect..ect... and why is it racist to point out a problem Brownbat??? You are so PC and liberal, you can't see the truth?? If i say there was a brawl in the stands at a NBA game involving a player, to someone in the streets and I said guess if they were a a black or white...guess? Just saying there is a problem and it goes towards education and discipline. Why do you think only the blacks had a problem with Sterns new dress code at games? Hear any whites bitvhing or moaning??? I stand by my remarks..you PC types disgust me, But I love giving it back to you..because I can!

posted by bluekarma at 04:04 PM on January 21

and why is it racist to point out a problem Brownbat Because you're not "pointing out a problem", blueklansman, you're indicting an entire race. Your assertions are crap and your logic is weak and worthless. Take your tiresome racist horseshit elsewhere.

posted by lil_brown_bat at 08:20 PM on January 21

My questions to you, bk, are why do you find the need to segregate race in many of your opinions? Why is it important to you? Do you somehow feel superior because you're white and can point out the mistakes of athletes who happen to be black? What is it about this whole exercise that gives you pleasure? And...when you use your Count how many instances we know of where a caucasian is guilty of any of it horseshit argument, you might do well to include the common knowledge that the vast majority of NBA players are black. Of course more black NBA athletes are going to be accused of more crimes or break more league rules. That's like saying that more blacks will be at the top in the stats lists...or that there are more whites at a KKK rally without the full compliment of teeth. Or 8th grade educations. Or morals. Or respect for their fellow man. What a fucking tool you are.

posted by Texan_lost_in_NY at 10:55 PM on January 21

The "racism" tone in many of these threads is getting old and played out. I think everyone can agree racism is, always has been, and probably always will be a problem. However, when I, personally, respond to these incidents, I'm not looking at it from that standpoint. The fact a black woman (with a black athlete husband) got into a minor altercation with a white man at the Bulls game is nothing more than a fact. When the two drunken idiots at the White Sox-Royals game attacked a white first base coach, the fact was it involved all white individuals. People need to be able to discuss situations for what they are without reading more into them, if for no other reason than the racism issue is one that will never be appropriately argued to a fitting conclusion. I agree with lbb that individuals who seem to only be here to get things riled up on the race topic need to go somewhere else.

posted by dyams at 08:03 AM on January 22

The fact a black woman (with a black athlete husband) got into a minor altercation with a white man at the Bulls game is nothing more than a fact. Agreed.

posted by Texan_lost_in_NY at 09:13 AM on January 22

...or that there are more whites at a KKK rally without the full compliment of teeth. Or 8th grade educations. Or morals. Or respect for their fellow man. That's priceless. Kudos, Texan.

posted by willthrill72 at 10:52 AM on January 22

i don' think that he should be punished because he was trying to help his wife who was in trouble how many otha men would have done this?

posted by northcarolinafan at 10:51 AM on January 23

Problem is, it appears more and more like his big-mouth wife WAS the trouble.

posted by dyams at 03:59 PM on January 23

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