FanDuel - WFBC

March 04, 2008

Brett Favre Retires: Brett Favre has told the Packers and coach Mike McCarthy Tuesday morning he's planning on retiring after 17 seasons.

posted by NerfballPro to football at 09:07 AM - 58 comments

Here's to a Hall of Fame career.

posted by BornIcon at 09:27 AM on March 04

Sorry to see him go, but I don't blame him for hanging them up. I couldn't imagine trying to play the game at his age. All of Wisconsin is going to have a really bad day today.

posted by BikeNut at 09:51 AM on March 04

It may be about time, though. As much as I'd hate to see him go, it's high time Aaron Rodgers gets a serious look at playing time. Brett doesn't exactly go out on top, but the Pack was resurgent this past year, earning a playoff berth and losing to the Giants in the NFC Championship game in OT. Three MVPs, one ring. Love him or hate him, he's Canton-bound in five years. Bet money on it.

posted by NerfballPro at 10:05 AM on March 04

Who would bet against Favre being in the Hall of Fame? Great career. I can see why he hung the cleats up. He was the coldest man on the field in the overtime at Lambeau against the Giants. You could tell he was thinking, "I'm too old for this shit." One aspect of his career that doesn't get enough praise is his durability. His consecutive game streak is Ripkenlike, and he was playing a physically brutal sport in which quarterbacks take a pounding. I don't know how he did it.

posted by rcade at 10:09 AM on March 04

Lots and lots of painkillers.

posted by apoch at 10:14 AM on March 04

Good on Brett. Classy guy and great player. I wish him the best. He's one of the reasons I love the Packers.

posted by hawkguy at 10:21 AM on March 04

His consecutive game streak is Ripkenlike Nearly as impressive as his career interceptions total. Nobody could throw it to the other team like ole Brett.

posted by r8rh8r27 at 10:25 AM on March 04

Really? 61,655 total passing yards and 442 touchdowns and you don't expect a few more interceptions than most quarterbacks? Good lord, he has been in the league since the dawn of time!

posted by hawkguy at 10:49 AM on March 04

While Favre is the all-time pick leader, his Career Interception% (3.3%) isn't outrageous. George Blanda's was 7%!

posted by yerfatma at 10:58 AM on March 04

I loved to watch Brett play when he was at Southern Miss. and wish I could have seen him live while in the NFL. Truly a remarkable QB and tougher then nails, taking hits other Qbs would not recover from before the next play. How he was able to play in Green Bay in the cold and snow as a southern boy is beyond me. I thought he would play a year or two there and then take the first job south of the MD line just to get warm. Shows how much I know. Thanks for the fun memories Brett and thank god you decided to hang up the cleats before you melted away and became a back-up for Aaron Rodgers.

posted by Folkways at 11:11 AM on March 04

One aspect of his career that doesn't get enough praise is his durability. His consecutive game streak is Ripkenlike.... No disrespect to either athlete but that so-called "hallowed" record is so overrated. How many times did Ripken and/or Favre play when they should of sat it out but kept on playing in order to keep the streak alive? How many times did they hurt their team by playing instead of having the healthier player play in their place? Just saying-

posted by BornIcon at 11:12 AM on March 04

You know, this is a time to reflect on how great Brett was. He was a class act on and off the field. When he messed up, he stepped up and told everyone (pain killers). He was a hard worker and loved the game so many of us could only imagine playing. I think its safe to say, first year eligible, he will be inducted to Canton and deservingly... Great career Brett... I was pulling for you after the Cowboys were tossed...

posted by bruce2ww at 11:22 AM on March 04

Have you looked at the Orioles roster recently? Ripken could still suit up and be better than most of them, hurt or not.

posted by BikeNut at 11:24 AM on March 04

He was the coldest man on the field in the overtime at Lambeau against the Giants. That stood out to me too, rcade. I thought he'd be the most comfortable, but seeing him put those pocket hand-warmers on his face/nose surprised me for sure. Meanwhile, Tom Coughlin looked like a little steaming devil all fired up. Ahh, memories. Congratulations to Brett Favre on an outstanding career.

posted by BoKnows at 11:33 AM on March 04

Great career, cool guy, but I still won't totally believe he's retired until the season starts and Aaron Rogers is under center as the starter.

posted by dyams at 11:38 AM on March 04

Gee, 7 comments into the thread and the snark about interceptions appears. What's the matter -- did you think bringing up the drug addiction would make you look like too much of an ass?

posted by joaquim at 11:38 AM on March 04

At the start of last year, I would have predicted my comment in this thread would have been "This was a long time coming." However, with what he did in 2007, I'm going to admit that he proved me VERY wrong. Congrats on a fine career and I look forward to his induction ceremony. (side note: I hope S.I. or ESPN does a feature on Favre in about 10 years. I'll be curious to see the effects of his consecutive game streak on his body/health.)

posted by grum@work at 11:42 AM on March 04

Wow. Brett Favre, one of the greatest pro athletes many of us have been fortunate enough to see announces his retirement, and some here take this opportunity to cap on him. Classy. He owe you money or something? I admit that I have a very strong bias towards Brett Favre and the Packers with me being a Seahawks fan, but really. The guy threw a lot of picks. He also gave some absolutely fantastic displays of Houdini-like escapes and miraculous late-game heroics. If you don't bet big, you don't win big. Tom Brady may be a better QB statistically (I have no idea) but for me, Favre was way more fun to watch. Win OR lose.

posted by THX-1138 at 11:44 AM on March 04

I hope S.I. or ESPN does a feature on Favre in about 10 years. I'll be curious to see the effects of his consecutive game streak on his body/health. I was watching some pregame thing this year, and he was walking onto the field to talk to somebody. He looked really, really stiff and very uncomfortable. I remember wondering if he was going to be able to walk in ten years. As for the interceptions -- that number is fairly meaningless for most quarterbacks. How many were random bounces or tips? How many were the fault of the receivers? How many came in situations where the score was heavily in the opponent's favour with time running out? Man, I know Aaron Rodgers is supposed to be good (for three games until he breaks his ankle), but I have a feeling I'm not going to be too pleased with the upcoming season...

posted by fabulon7 at 12:05 PM on March 04

Rodgers is NOT the answer, they must draft the next Favre or acquire. They must do it now, or they could go 0-16.

posted by SFValley_Dude at 12:20 PM on March 04

I am a Bears fan, and this would be the perfect time to really rag on Brett, but I can't. He is going to go down as THE best QB ever. He was so frustrating to watch as an opponent. You knew if he had the ball at the end of the game, you were going to lose. How many come from behind wins did he manufacture? He was a gunslinger, and fun to watch. QB's today are boring. Brett was anything but boring. The Bears need a QB coach, so when you're ready, Go work for them. Stay in the game that you love, and that loves you.

posted by scuubie at 12:24 PM on March 04

Gee, 7 comments into the thread and the snark about interceptions appears. What's the matter -- did you think bringing up the drug addiction would make you look like too much of an ass? Let us all petition for a policy that prohibits any negative comments in threads until the last post!

posted by danjel at 12:29 PM on March 04

He is going to go down as THE best QB ever Whoa, based on what?

posted by yerfatma at 12:29 PM on March 04

Here's to a Hall of Fame career. ...he's Canton-bound in five years. ...first year eligible What they said. And to come out the day after your father dies and have the best game of your career. He will be remembered as one of the greats.

posted by steelergirl at 12:31 PM on March 04

My eight-year-old son is going to be so bummed . . . he heard some announcers speculating on Favre's retirement at the end of the season, and he told me to change the channel. To him, every interception was the receiver's fault.

posted by Uncle Toby at 12:46 PM on March 04

He is going to go down as THE best QB ever Whoa, based on what? What, John Madden's not entitled to his opinion?

posted by dyams at 12:48 PM on March 04

I'm strangely really emotional about this today, but I suppose that can be said for most Wisconsinites and die-hard Packer fans. Thanks for 17 amazing years, Brett.

posted by evixir at 01:00 PM on March 04

I believe Favre may very well rank as the greatest regular season QB of all-time. But add the playoffs in there, and while I whole-heartedly agree that he's a first-ballot HoF'er, he's not in the top five all-time. No QB either played bad games in playoff games or made more critical bad throws in a big game to cost his team than Favre. It's too bad that the last play of his career is a fine example of what I speak of. But he did provide a lot of fine moments for the Packer faithful, and deserves best wishes for his retirement. He has the retirement of his number and the Hall of Fame to look forward to, and deservingly so.

posted by TheQatarian at 01:07 PM on March 04

Wow. Brett Favre, one of the greatest pro athletes many of us have been fortunate enough to see announces his retirement, and some here take this opportunity to cap on him. Classy. He owe you money or something? What I want to know is why someone can't say anything negative about the man without it being considered "classless". I agree with the comments about his INTs. The man threw a lot of them. He personally cost his team some games (and titles) due to REALLY BAD decisions. He also won his team a lot of games (and title) because of that mentality, and that washes out for a lot of people, but that doesn't mean he's immune to criticism for the first part. In a thread talking about his career, that sort of discussion should be open game without it being taken as "classless". As for the interceptions -- that number is fairly meaningless for most quarterbacks. How many were random bounces or tips? How many were the fault of the receivers? How many came in situations where the score was heavily in the opponent's favour with time running out? I can't answer that. But I can say I saw him make decisions in important games (throwing a ball straight up in the air because he was under pressure, throwing into triple coverage in the redzone) that 1st year QB's don't make...and he was doing that in his 16th and 17th year. And to come out the day after your father dies and have the best game of your career. That's a game I will always remember. And that falls right in line with my other point in that at least 3 of his TD's that game were thrown up for grabs where his guys made a play at the other end. I will remember that game not only for his heroic effort, but the way his teammates all had herculean efforts to give him that game of his life. That says a lot for the man, in and of itself. He was a good QB, a terrific leader, and an amazing personality. He did make a LOT of bad decisions, however.

posted by bdaddy at 01:13 PM on March 04

No QB either played bad games in playoff games or made more critical bad throws in a big game to cost his team than Favre. yes, but I wouldn't say it was specific to playoffs. He did the same in regular season too, though just threw a lot of WINS around it. I guess what I'm getting at is his "consistency". His style of play was fun to watch and he literally pulled out games single-handedly during his career. Sometimes he even made bad teams pretty good with that style of play and ability he had (well deserved of the MVP those years he won it). But the lack of consistency in that style of play makes it very difficult to win championships. In most cases you have to win 3 or 4 games in a row to get to the SB. And that's hard to do with a guy who just "wings it". As you mention that last play of his career is very indicative of Favre's WHOLE career. An absolutely atrocious decision on a ball that should have never been thrown, and a mistake that you wouldn't expect a ROOKIE to make, all causing a loss on a game they could have won had he played smarter. Again, it's hard to compare against the fact that they may not even be in that position in the playoffs without that gunslinger mentality to begin with, but it's worthy of looking at/criticizing never-the-less.

posted by bdaddy at 01:27 PM on March 04

What I want to know is why someone can't say anything negative about the man without it being considered "classless". What I want to know is why I can't say it was classless. That wasn't exactly what I said. But feel free to snark. I will feel free to comment on it. And I don't believe I was addressing anything you posted. I admit my bias. To me, to comment on Favre's failings on a Brett Favre retirement thread looks a bit like someone has an agenda. The guy announces that he is ending a sure HOF career, so now is the time to find the dark lining in the silver cloud? If someone else can say what they want, so can I.

posted by THX-1138 at 01:34 PM on March 04

In addition to all of his great work on the field, Favre will always have a place in my heart because of his appearance in "There's Something About Mary." One of the all time greatest walk on gags in comedy history.

posted by Joey Michaels at 02:16 PM on March 04

My personal favorite quarterback in a comedy is Peyton Manning from when he hosted SNL a little while back. Too bad NBC removed the clips from youtube.

posted by Ying Yang Mafia at 02:23 PM on March 04

He also did a lot of charity work for Katrina victims. Once again, a classy dude. And Joey, you are right. His "There's Something about Mary" gig was awesome stuff.

posted by hawkguy at 02:27 PM on March 04

Sucks for the Packers losing a hall of famer who outplayed guys 10 years younger than him. Even though the Pack have a good team, I don't know if Aaron Rodgers can lead them to the playoffs. Brett had to retire sometime though and everybody knew it. At least he ended on a good note by getting the TD record and getting to the NFC Championship Game which they almost won.

posted by Scars at 02:34 PM on March 04

Once again, a classy dude Well continuing on my "classless" path of not felating the man on the day of his retirement, I'll bring up another criticism I have. Why is Favre always considered the ultimate class act? This is the same guy who refuses to teach Aaron Rodgers because he says he doesn't owe him anything. A year or 2 back, he kept his team in utter dark about whether he was retiring and said he didn't owe them anything as far as letting them know his retirement plans (leaving them wondering what to do with their QB situation). He criticized his own teammate (Walker) for not getting to camp (and Walker then blows his ACL in his contract year illustrating the fact of WHY HE SHOULD HAVE held out). He openly criticized his FO for not making a play for Moss. It just seems to me if a guy like T.O. would do something like that, the media would be all over him....but when Favre does it guys like Wilborn on ESPN say "He's EARNED that right". I mean, I don't hate the guy, but I'm not ready to put him on a pedestal either. He was a good football player, but let's not sling a cape on him, stamp his chest with an S, and make him the epitome of class and honor.

posted by bdaddy at 03:40 PM on March 04

I will miss him. He was never one of my favorite players, nor would I ever watch a Packers game just to see him, but when I did watch, I really enjoyed the game. You can say whatever you want about his career numbers, but the one fact remains. For 17 years this guy was one of the best performers on the field. In modern American professional sports, it's all about entertainment, and he certainly provided a lot of it.

posted by Howard_T at 03:44 PM on March 04

Well-timed, I'd say. He had an MVP year if it weren't for Brady. He's going out virtually as on-top as one can get. You can nitpick holes in his game if you like - but really I think that is as indicative of his brilliance as anything. The guy is so popular and good and seemingly decent that it's catnip for haters. I'd say he's a top ten all-time QB.

posted by WeedyMcSmokey at 04:06 PM on March 04

I've changed my mind. Brett Favre is a dick. Good riddance, asshat.

posted by THX-1138 at 04:54 PM on March 04

He went to the Packers, matured, and had a huge career. I'm sure the Falcons and their fans wondered "What Might Have Been" for a long time, but in those days, prior to the trade, Favre was a stumbling drunk. I listened to him on Sportscenter talking about when he was with Atlanta and how he was out drinking constantly. He showed up after the team photo had been taken one year, said he made up an excuse to the coach about being in a car wreck or train wreck, and the coach then looked at him, eyes all bloodshot, hair everywhere, and said, "Son, you are a trainwreck." Alcohol almost halted his career and his marriage, but he overcame it. Hopefully he sticks with this retirement.

posted by dyams at 06:05 PM on March 04

See ya Bret. I'll miss ya.

posted by Ironhead at 07:06 PM on March 04

thanks for the memories.

posted by rockstar2001 at 07:17 PM on March 04

INTERCEPTIONS! What quarterback has not had significant ones? I like "blaming the receiver." Not only is Favre a great player in this game, he is a great model for young people (and older for that matter). Best wishes and all blessings. Enjoy!

posted by twoman at 08:46 PM on March 04

Hey, if you don't make mistakes, you ain't trying hard enough (or doing anything new). Heard on the NPR about this, and how his style of play tended to drive the coaching staff crazy because of the interceptions, yet, at the same time, allowed him to make completions most people wouldn't even try. Happy retirement, Brett. There's more to life than just the pigskin, so I hope you enjoy it.

posted by worldcup2002 at 09:23 PM on March 04

RE: Bret Favre's INT numbers I liken this to a guard in basketball and the amount of turnovers they produce. Just like Favre (obviously one of the all-time greats) many great guards have huge TO numbers (check out Stockton, Kidd, Johnson, and AI's numbers) If you are handling or passing the more you are more apt to turn it over. I think the INT numbers are a direct result of Favre staring in so many games and throwing the ball as much as he did.

posted by HATER 187 at 10:03 PM on March 04

Also the int's are a direct result of him taking more chances, i liken it to when brett threw that one pass to freemen that bounced off a viking and hit freeman in the back and he still caught"brett'll throw it up there and see what happens"

posted by rockstar2001 at 10:29 PM on March 04

Brett Favre helped to give us all 17 great years of football to watch. Favre should go down as ONE OF the best QB's in the game, and also the most durable QB ever. As far as this statement from above: How many times did they hurt their team by playing instead of having the healthier player play in their place? I'd still take a hurt, hung over, puking Brett Favre then a healthy Aaron Rodgers, or ALMOST any back up, any day! So did the Packers, and it got them to the playoff's in 11 out of the 16 seasons he was with them. Thanks Brett, you sure as hell were fun to watch on Sunday or Monday, oh and the occasional Thursday or Saturday too.

posted by jojomfd1 at 09:57 PM on March 05

Doesn't seem right. But there he is, up there telling us it's true. Still has more game than what, 3, maybe 4, other qb's in the league. Doesn't seem right. But there he is.

posted by chmurray at 05:03 PM on March 06

Being in Wisconsin for this is a bit like being surrounded by Maddens. It's as scary as it sounds. I can't talk to anybody about sports without them gushing to me about how much they'll miss Brett and how much he meant to them, often punctuated with how well they think Rodgers will do. It was cute at first but I'm growing weary of it. /not really a Packer fan, though I liked watching Brett.

posted by tron7 at 06:19 PM on March 06

It amazes me how many of you have missed the point to one extreme or the other. His interceptions did not at all diminish his quality, nor did his greatness lie in his superior play. Favre will not go down as the greatest QB ever. Probably not even top five. And even if he did, that too, is not his legacy. What Brett Favre will be remembered for is the child-like joy with which he played the game, and with the way that joy was contagious to the fans. The game was always more fun with him on the field. The game was always in question if he was on the field and the pack trailed. But mostly, he brought a joy to the game that we dont see enough in our star players. In a day dominated by business-like play of Peyton Manning, or Tom Brady, or the love-me-some-me attitudes of Terrell Owens, or the emperor palpatinesque coldness of Bill Belicheck, Brett Favre reminded us that football is a game no matter at what level you play. He will absolutely be in the hall in five years. He will absolutely be remembered as one of the all time greats, but what he brings to the game is not just tallent, or knowledge, its something far more basic, and far more valuable:joy. Thank you Brett, enjoy your retirement.

posted by elijahin24 at 10:43 PM on March 06

And thank you, Mister Madden, for stopping by.

posted by The_Black_Hand at 06:13 AM on March 07

I think that I will remember Favre less for his statistics and more for how much fun he seemed to have playing the game. Maybe more than any other player, it seemed like the camera so often caught him smiling or laughing or cracking a joke. It's a good way to be remembered.

posted by lil_brown_bat at 07:59 AM on March 07

That's my feelings exactly, lbb. I try not to get involved in the "He's a top-three all-time QB" or top ten, whatever. There's no way of proving that. But the way Favre approached the game, the competition, having fun to the point you can still almost imagine these guys are actually playing a game is something very few athletes have ever managed to pull off. When a player like this retires people (rightfully so) tend to forget the horrible, interception-riddled playoff games and other career blips and instead remember the good. There was one hell of a lot of good with Favre. Same thing went when Jim Kelly was in Buffalo. Believe me, I remember all the moaning and BS people used to toss Kelly's way when he'd throw one of his many late-game, key interceptions. He endured a lot of garbage and abuse by fans during his years with the Bills but, in the end, people remembered the great accomplishments, the great games, and the love those same fans showed Kelly at his Canton enshrinement will probably only be topped by the love shown to Favre when he goes into the Hall of Fame. Kelly proved (and proves to this day) how he grew to love the city of Buffalo (no small accomplishment) the same way Favre loved Green Bay. That's what fans remember and respect someone for, long after the playing days are over.

posted by dyams at 08:36 AM on March 07

I have complete respect for any professional player who remains loyal to the community he plays in. I have always linked Favre with my undying love for George Brett because of this. In addition, just as you won't hear an ill word spoken about Favre in Green Bay, you won't hear one about Brett in the KC area. That plus what lbb said. Damn, they were both fun to watch.

posted by hawkguy at 08:51 AM on March 07

HOW MANY MORE TIMES DO WE HAVE TO SEE HIM CRY ON ESPN. THEY SEEM TO RUN HIS RETIREMENT EVERY HOUR. GET A LIFE.

posted by chip chop at 12:18 PM on March 07

Easy on the caps lock there trigger.

posted by hawkguy at 12:24 PM on March 07

Yo, chip chop; change the channel.

posted by dyams at 01:01 PM on March 07

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