FanDuel - WFBC

July 25, 2007

One wouldn't think that the car bombings were not related to the futbol teams victory unless it was in response to the ethnically diverse team. Ridiculous and tragic. On another note, without trying to offend anyone of middle eastern heritage, what is the deal with the celebratory gunfire? It's not news that this is a splendid way to randomly kill people so why do it to express ones happiness at the probable cause of someone else's remorse? Throw a party. Hoot and hollar. Hell, light fireworks. But ditch the firearms.

posted by THX-1138 at 02:14 PM on July 25

On another note, without trying to offend anyone of middle eastern heritage, what is the deal with the celebratory gunfire? Firing guns to celebrate Christmas or New Year is a tradition in many parts of the US. It's obviously less practiced nowadays, being more or less against the law, but if it weren't outlawed and we weren't a society under the rule of law, you can bet there would be plenty of "celebratory gunfire" in these United States.

posted by lil_brown_bat at 02:32 PM on July 25

Firing guns to celebrate Christmas or New Year is a tradition in many parts of the US. It's obviously less practiced nowadays, being more or less against the law, but if it weren't outlawed and we weren't a society under the rule of law, you can bet there would be plenty of "celebratory gunfire" in these United States. It's still a fairly regular occurrence here in Chicago, but I believe has decreased in recent years. This article suggests 450 reported shots (which I would have to imagine includes a fair bit of duplicate reports) to ring in 2006, versus 600 for 2005. Every three or so years, it seems like someone dies as a result of a celebratory bullet coming back down to earth very fast.

posted by holden at 03:22 PM on July 25

And now back to Iraq where at least 50 football fans have been senselessly slaughtered whilst celebrating their team's semi-final victory. Poor bastards.

posted by squealy at 04:11 PM on July 25

THX, I think it might also depend on who's doing the bombing. Depending on how orthodox (or unorthodox) their beliefs are, the very attire worn to play the game can be considered illegal. As for the celebratory shooting, it's not just Chicago. I grew up in the South, and more than once heard a particular NASCAR or SEC Football win punctuated with the unmistakeable roar of Double Barrels of Redneck Fun. After Desert Storm, there was much celebratory fire in the streets of Kuwait City and the surrounding areas. It got so bad in some areas that we were afraid to sleep outside in tents, and bunches of us would set up camp in the lobbies of abandoned office buildings and hotels. A strange custom to be sure, no matter who's doing it. And a sad statement on humanity, setting off a bomb in the midst of your own countrymen as they celebrate a rare happy moment. Savage, brutal, cowardly, and a tragic waste of life in a place where life certainly needs to recapture some of its value.

posted by The_Black_Hand at 04:50 PM on July 25

One wouldn't think that the car bombings were not related to the futbol teams victory unless it was in response to the ethnically diverse team. I haven't read any account to suggest that the fans were targeted for being supporters of the football team. I think part of the terror strategy employed by the Iraqi insurgents/anarchists/terrorists/whatever you want to call them is to take out as many people as possible. So any large crowd is a target. And large crowds had gathered to celebrate the victory. According to the NYT (really the AP), "But these bombings, in parked cars less than an hour apart in separate corners of Baghdad, appeared designed to gain attention rather than target a particular sect." (emphasis added)

posted by holden at 05:03 PM on July 25

The things people do in the name of GOD.

posted by Atheist at 05:24 PM on July 25

The things people do in the name of GOD. To attribute an act of sectarian violence in Iraq to a religious squabble doesn't do justice to the complexity of the situation there and the motivations of those perpetrating the violence. But you are, after all, the Atheist, so gotta get your digs in huh? Kind of like in the Coolbaugh thread.

posted by holden at 05:46 PM on July 25

A strange custom to be sure, no matter who's doing it. Even stranger when at a funeral. I got caught up in a Hamas procession a few years ago in Ramallah. My ears are still ringing from AKs going off a few feet from my head. By the way, that Iraqi team is pretty good - they walloped Australia 3-1 in the group games and many of the same players did very well at the 2004 Olympics. Made up of both Sunnis and Shi'ites, in a better world, their performances would be bringing people together.

posted by owlhouse at 06:22 PM on July 25

Words fail me.

posted by Abiezer at 06:59 PM on July 25

Cecil Adams addresses the question of Celebratory Gunfire: How dangerous is it anyway? His answer: "It has been scientifically shown that firing guns into the air for entertainment is not a good idea. Please stop right away. Also knock off with the holy wars and random violence. Thank you."

posted by Adam at 01:24 AM on July 26

.

posted by Fence at 04:59 AM on July 26

Very sad, though the universe clearly has a sense of irony given they beat Vietnam... As for firing guns in the air, clearly the people who do that need some elementary physics lesson. "What goes up must come down".

posted by Drood at 05:42 PM on July 26

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