September 02, 2006

Marbury vs. Madison Avenue: Can Stephon Marbury's $15 sneaker revolutionize the sports-shoe business?

posted by justgary to basketball at 12:25 PM - 12 comments

Who cares that he's an arrogant flop and basketball-court crybaby. He sells cheap shoes. That's, apparently, what counts.

posted by roberts at 01:47 PM on September 02

But if my job involved covering ankle-breaker Dwyane Wade, and if my ability to earn millions of dollars hinged on protecting my fragile feet and ankles, then I'd probably want a little more arch support. In fact, I'd probably want to wear the best, highest-performance equipment money can buy. Not even Marbury is making that claim about his shoes. Something tells me that it dosent matter what kind of shoes Marbury is wearing- he can't guard anyone. As for the shoes, I don't see them being all that popular, since the people he is targeting generally like to wear expenisve shoes. Shaq has decent shoes, but don't nearly make as much money as the Jordan line. In addition to that, Shaq actually wins ballgames, something Marbury has yet ot do in his career.

posted by Kendall at 01:55 PM on September 02

I was a sucker for the Sprewells. I even bought his rims. Now if I just had a car.

posted by HATER 187 at 03:55 PM on September 02

As for the shoes, I don't see them being all that popular, since the people he is targeting generally like to wear expenisve shoes. The article said there were lines, so obviously kids are interested. Who says that the kids he is targeting like to wear expensive shoes? More like they are wearing expensive shoes because they are cool, not just because they are expensive. Kids have long liked Marbury and part of it is his attitude (that many grown-ups don't find appealing.) Jordan's complete lack of social awareness about the impact of selling ridiculously priced sneakers has always pissed me off. I appreciate that Marbury is aware who his fans are and is endorsing a product that they can enjoy without getting them stolen on the way to school. I hope more players follow suit.

posted by bperk at 04:54 PM on September 02

are they going to sell them in the grocery store with the string attached?

posted by mikey80 at 07:06 PM on September 02

Jordan's complete lack of social awareness about the impact of selling ridiculously priced sneakers has always pissed me off. I find it ironic that Jordan, a black man, has made millions of dollars hawking products made by slaves.

posted by joromu at 08:51 PM on September 02

More like they are wearing expensive shoes because they are cool, not just because they are expensive. Since when is Stephon Marbury cool? He can't even lead his team to a .500 season, much less make the playoffs. He's a shoot first point guard, who cannot win games, and obviously makes a cheaply made shoe. Lets see how many people keep buying his shoes when they start to fall apart. Marbury doesnt get paid to endorse the shoes, but rather gets paid by how many shoes sell. By making them cost effective, Marbury ensurses that he will make a pretty penny. Just because 75 people lined up at a mall dosent ensure that Marbury or "Starbury" shoes will be a big hit.

posted by Kendall at 09:47 PM on September 02

I hate Stephon Marbury. The guy is a prima donna and a jerk. The guy can't play team ball and is on a terrible team. I can't believe anyone is buying his shoes. I know they're only $15, but if you don't like Marbury, then stand up for what you believe in no matter how small. I hate Marbury and wouldn't wear his shoes if I was paid to. And how did he get that nickname "Starbury" anyway? The guy is a bum and selfish. Some star. If you are a fan of Marbury, there's something wrong with you. I'll stay with my quality $35 shoes without some primadonna's name on it.

posted by nort_12345 at 10:22 PM on September 02

nort_12345, if you care enough to come back & read this: It's Starbury because he's the Star, because of his ability and his showmanship. Now before you jump down my throat for defending him: I have a theory. I don't hate Stephon Marbury, but he's in the wrong end of the game. He's just the best playground baller in the world. He's so good that he's one of the very few who has been able to take his game inside to an NBA court. But make no mistake; this isn't his element. His talents are to freewheel it, to be showy, to run the court back & forth, to fill the hole with rocks, passing and strategy be damned. Thirty years ago, he'd have rocked the starting five of the Harlem Globetrotters, with Curly Neal, Meadowlark Lemon & Marques Haynes. He's not a bad guy. Listen to him speak, about this shoe deal, about New York City, about the things and people who matter to him. He does a lot of work for others, and I sense that he's aware of the weight he carries as The Star of the Knicks. But he's a Rucker Park hero stuck in Madison Square Garden (making huge bucks, but still), and if he sees this shoe thing as a way to correct some karma, well, I'll take the gesture in good faith, and hope the shoes themselves are good, and that they sell. I might even buy a pair myself.

posted by chicobangs at 11:38 PM on September 02

Having grown up in $10 canvas and rubber Converse All-Star Hi-Tops, I have long thought that most of todays "athletic shoes" were ridiculously overpriced. If Marbury's shoes look OK, I'll buy'em.

posted by mjkredliner at 12:03 AM on September 03

Since when is Stephon Marbury cool? Marbury has always been cool as far as kids are concerned. His jersey sales are always high. Lets see how many people keep buying his shoes when they start to fall apart. Did you read the article? They make inexpensive clothes because of how they run their business, not necessarily because they are poorly made. And that really doesn't matter anyway for kids because they grow out of clothes so fast that it is time to by them a new pair before you turn around. Any parent would rather be buying Starbury shoes over a pair of Jordans. Just because 75 people lined up at a mall dosent ensure that Marbury or "Starbury" shoes will be a big hit. Why would people be lining up for them as soon as they came out?

posted by bperk at 12:53 PM on September 03

Having grown up in $10 canvas and rubber Converse All-Star Hi-Tops I love my Chucks, but it still floors me (so to speak) that old school pros actually played ball in those shoes. I would have thought that plantar fascitis, shin splints and other foot and lower leg injuries would have been endemic. They give you next to no protection, support or cushion at all.

posted by psmealey at 02:47 PM on September 03

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