November 15, 2018

SportsFilter: The Thursday Huddle:

A place to discuss the sports stories that aren't making news, share links that aren't quite front-page material, and diagram plays on your hand. Remember to count to five Mississippi before commenting in anger.

posted by huddle to general at 06:00 AM - 9 comments

What the hell? Did he eventually get arrested for that assault?

posted by NoMich at 11:29 AM on November 15

Seattle by 3

posted by tron7 at 12:14 PM on November 15

LOCK Seattle by 5 LOCK

posted by bender at 12:50 PM on November 15

Did he eventually get arrested for that assault?

Not yet, and unless one of the colleges involved or the player assaulted presses charges, it is not likely. Law enforcement agencies seem to avoid pressing charges for things that happen on the playing field or court.

posted by Howard_T at 01:01 PM on November 15

The article says he's a criminal justice major. I'm sure this video won't haunt him in a job interview...

posted by bender at 01:29 PM on November 15

The article says he's a criminal justice major. I'm sure this video won't haunt him in a job interview...

Play in a senior league and I can tell you that type of stuff isn't out of the ordinary when playing against the law enforcement teams .. for whatever reason.

posted by cixelsyd at 03:16 PM on November 15

I've coached youth sports against teams from Gardner and Fitchburg quite a bit. Frontier justice and sharp elbows are the rule of the day at all age levels. I had one girls U14 soccer player who never liked to tuck in her jersey. After the opposing nasties pulled her down from behind by her shirt tail several times during the run of play when the homegrown refs weren't looking or didn't care, she changed her mind and tucked it in. At that point, the nasties switched gears and went for the long ponytail trailing behind, which made for a handy grab a hold that was too enticing to resist.

My player was lucky. It was an October game and the ground hadn't frozen hard yet. The turf still had a little give to it when you got slammed down.

Our keepers were taught to quickly go into a full fetal curl to secure a ball on the ground in front of the goal. Anything less than that, and the other team would keep flailing away at all body parts of the defenseless keeper until the ref eventually realized they needed to blow a whistle. No foul, just momentary stoppage of play.

In one boys U10 game, there was virtually no officiating. My guys would stop when they knew there should be a stoppage, but play wasn't halted and the other team kept going. We had a zero tolerance policy against coaches talking to the refs. I couldn't say a word to them. So I had to holler to my guys stuff like: "If he's not going to use his whistle, just play on until he does use it". Making sure the ref was nearby when I said it.

Fast forward 5 or 6 years in the sporting life of a young player and you get what you saw on the video.

posted by beaverboard at 03:38 PM on November 15

Law enforcement agencies seem to avoid pressing charges for things that happen on the playing field or court.

This makes sense most of the time, but some actions are so egregious and outside the boundaries of normal play that they ought to be treated like a crime.

This is one of them. It's as bad as a player punching a ref.

posted by rcade at 08:18 PM on November 15

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