August 02, 2017

Legendary Notre Dame Coach Ara Parseghian Dies at 94: Parseghian took the reins of a 2-7 Fighting Irish team and went 9-1 the next year. He would bring Notre Dame back to national prominence, including two national championships. A legendary presence in college football, Parseghian was universally loved, even by his fiercest opponents.

posted by Etrigan to football at 09:19 PM - 7 comments

Had the pleasure of meeting him several times (mostly in the 80s). He was always a true gentleman. He was one of the reasons I was a Notre Dame fan as a youngster (though, I sort of grew out of it in the last couple of years/lol.). R.I.P. Mr. Parseghian.

posted by jagsnumberone at 03:02 AM on August 03

One of the greats, and a man who helped my alma mater Miami University become known as the Cradle of Coaches. Not many like him anymore.

posted by tahoemoj at 02:33 PM on August 03

Much like Idi Amin, he may be gone, but will live on in crosswords forever.

posted by yerfatma at 02:46 PM on August 03

Truly the gold standard, and the problem at ND is that they began to think that it was the aura of their sanctified program that ensured the glory that was rightfully theirs. They've had a lot of other people give the job a shot and none since Coach Parseghian have met that standard.

I must say I've always felt bad for Dan Devine. There was no way he was going to get a fair shake following Parseghian, and Irish fans made his life miserable at times. It was almost preordained that he wouldn't be able to measure up. The bums in South Bend didn't realize how good they had it with him until after he was gone.

Then they got their just reward. Gerry Faust. Serves 'em right.

Parseghian was most fortunate in that he coached in an era before Brent Musburger began his orgasmic tenure as Notre Dame Fawner-in-Chief. Musburger spent untold hours of airtime enraptured in breathless wonder at the likes of Offensive Coordinator Bob Davie and game changing boy genius Ron Powlus. Brent spent what seemed like a decade verbally grooming Davie for the top job at every opportunity.

At one point, becoming the object of Musburger's affection was a surefire path to underwhelming mediocrity and widespread disillusionment among the faithful. Musburger almost had to be hosed down and sedated during Powlus' first start; the Irish obliged by struggling to beat Northwestern, who were strictly doormats at the time. It was a foretaste of what was to come.

posted by beaverboard at 05:42 PM on August 03

Offensive Coordinator Bob Davie and game changing boy genius Ron Powlus

As revenge for the full-body shudder you just gave me, I feel the need to point out Davie was the D Coordinator.

posted by yerfatma at 10:10 AM on August 04

Damn, you are totally correct.

I should have fact checked, but under the current circumstances, I think I have fact check fatigue. It's all anyone seems to be doing.

I used to think that the producers in the truck would show Davie on the sideline just to get Musburger jacked up, which was guaranteed to happen.

"Now there's Bob Davie, one of the brightest young minds in the coaching profession. Some say he could be the next head coach in South Bend when Coach Holtz decides to hang 'em up..."

I don't know whether Holtz ever saw or knew about these tender moments, but I'm pretty sure that's when he started spitting all over people whenever he spoke.

Watching Lou Holtz speak is like video taping somebody eating corn on the cob and then playing it backwards.

posted by beaverboard at 12:09 PM on August 04

I should have fact checked, but under the current circumstances, I think I have fact check fatigue.

You probably got confused remembering how much better the other team's offense got when Davie was around. Watching Holtz speak always makes me wish his dentures finally win and lodge themselves in his throat.

posted by yerfatma at 02:49 PM on August 04

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