FanDuel - WFBC

November 22, 2011

Plummer to Tebow: A Little Less Jesus, Please: Former Denver Broncos quarterback Jake Plummer would like to see current quarterback Tim Tebow cut down the number of references to Jesus Christ. "I think that when he accepts the fact that we know that he loves Jesus Christ, then I think I'll like him a little better," Plummer said on Phoenix sports radio station XTRA Sports 910. "I don't hate him because of that, I just would rather not have to hear that every single time he takes a good snap or makes a good handoff."

posted by rcade to football at 02:09 PM - 31 comments

Tebow's response: "If you're married and you have a wife and you really love your wife, is it good enough to only say to your wife 'I love her' the day you get married? Or should you tell her every single day when you wake up and every opportunity? That's how I feel about my relationship with Jesus Christ."

posted by rcade at 02:12 PM on November 22

I think Tebow missed Plummer's point, as there is a difference between telling your wife you love her every day, and telling every single person you talk to about how much you love your wife.

posted by apoch at 02:14 PM on November 22

I think Tebow missed Plummer's point, as there is a difference between telling your wife you love her every day, and telling every single person you talk to about how much you love your wife.

That depends on if your wife can turn water into wine.

posted by BornIcon at 02:29 PM on November 22

@ apoch, tongue in cheek, Amen brother.

posted by Tinman at 02:31 PM on November 22

More lulz: John Elway still not sure QB Tim Tebow is franchise's future. I think if an offense is only 17 for 72 on third down attempts under a certain quarterback's tenure, then I'm inclined to agree with Mr. Elway. Besides, doesn't the defense deserve at least some credit during this stretch of wins? Seems like they are scoring as many touchdowns as the offense is.

posted by NoMich at 02:33 PM on November 22

Wow, Jake Plummer's playing hall monitor? What's next, no cursing in the locker room? Jesus Fucking Christ.

posted by phaedon at 02:38 PM on November 22

To continue with apoch's point. It's fine to tell Jesus that you love him every day, hell even every ten minutes, if that's what you want to do. It's just not necessary to do so in a public forum, or with a bullhorn. People, regardless of faith or the lack thereof, will react negatively to you. If you thank Jesus for every little success you have in your life, people will start to resent, and even cheer against, that success.

posted by tahoemoj at 02:40 PM on November 22

Or he needs to start blaming Jesus for his failures. I'd be ok with that.

posted by yerfatma at 02:50 PM on November 22

That's actually not true. Sports figures thank God all the time in public forums.

I just think Tebow comes off as a shallow Jesus fanboy (at least to passers by, such as myself). It is kind of funny to think that in the back of their heads people are thinking, maybe some divine power is propelling this talentless donkey to a 4-1 start. Few want to buy that storyline.

posted by phaedon at 02:51 PM on November 22

I agree with Plummer. While I personally think Tebow is a very nice young man and want to root for him to succeed when others say he can't, I dislike the fact that he has to constantly preach and remind us of what a religious zealot he is.

Frankly to me it comes off as arrogant. Although I can appreciate he feels his genetic ability is some sort of gift from his lord, does he really believe that Jesus has chosen him specifically to be successful on the football field? Does he think god wants him to be an ambassador for Christianity on every sports interview and post game show.

The world is full of pain and suffering, and while millions starve or are affected by natural disasters or poverty, it seems completely arrogant to believe that with all god has to deal with, he is spending one second shining a special light on Tim Tebow so that he can succeed in the NFL. I am certain god does not give a shit if the Denver Broncos make the final drive to the end zone or not. If Tim Tebow believes he does or he is in some way special, or blessed beyond the genetic gifts he received by growing up in that body, more power to him but PLEASE Tim, keep it to yourself.

I thought about this a lot after the last game while I watched the visible discomfort with him that Marshall Faulk could not hide during the Tebow post game interview on the NFL network. It seems to me ramming religion down viewers throats when most watching have chosen to enjoy football is awfully presumptuous. I would have no problem if he want to have his own religious TV show but as an Atheist football fan, don't I have the right to tune into football to see and hear about football without having to be subjected to religious indoctrination?

posted by Atheist at 02:59 PM on November 22

I guess we should be lucky it's Jesus that we're talking about. If it were Mohammed and these kinds of comments were being posted, y'all would be heading into the annual American infidel feast of overindulgence with Excedrin-sized fatwas hanging over all y'all's heads.

Interesting that the offense in mountain high Denver, halfway to the kingdom of heaven, struggles to bear shining witness to God's glory, while in the forsaken land of sinners below sea level, the vertical prowess of the band of believers called the Saints is known to all nations, and their armament gleameth like gold.

posted by beaverboard at 03:47 PM on November 22

It's just not necessary to do so in a public forum, or with a bullhorn. People, regardless of faith or the lack thereof, will react negatively to you. If you thank Jesus for every little success you have in your life, people will start to resent, and even cheer against, that success.

Kurt Warner.. Drew Brees.. Mike Singletary.. Sam Bradford.. Mass Hasselbeck.. Michael Vick..

posted by phaedon at 03:49 PM on November 22

Did you not notice the derision that many heaped on Warner for his public displays of faith? Never heard anyone crack wise about Singletary's enormous cross? As far as Brees, Bradford, Hasselbeck, and Vick--they're not even in the same ballpark as Tebow when it comes to praising Jesus for every little thing. Because I've never heard a single one of them sound preachy, I'd point to them as prime examples of people of faith who don't make it the central aspect of their personality. (Vick? Really? Something tells me he's not in the "god boy" club) Further, I remember negativity directed at Kitna for his crucifix sideline hat and Roethlisberger for his "P.F.J." (Play for Jesus) cleats. Frankly to me it comes off as arrogant. Although I can appreciate he feels his genetic ability is some sort of gift from his lord, does he really believe that Jesus has chosen him specifically to be successful on the football field? Does he think god wants him to be an ambassador for Christianity on every sports interview and post game show.

The word you're looking for there is "solipsistic." And yes, he does.

posted by tahoemoj at 04:12 PM on November 22

I don't really have a problem with Tebow's expression of faith. He seems to believe it completely and doesn't come off as if this is a role he is playing (some athletes do). Generally, I have a problem with evangelical Christians being the face of Christianity because I think they give the rest of us a bad name. So, while I don't agree that Christianity requires what Tebow thinks it requires, I don't have a specific problem with Tebow.

And one more thing, if Tebow would change his expressions of faith to please the Plummer's of the world, that would be a problem and then you would have to question Tebow's genuineness.

posted by bperk at 04:40 PM on November 22

Speaking of players of faith, like Warner, Brees, Bradford, Hasselbeck, Vick and Singletary, none of them were nearly as over the top as Tebow. I wouldn't really mind it but along the same lines, it may be one thing to thank the lord for your winning a Super Bowl or having a successful career, but was Jesus also responsible for the fact the Singletary was a horrific coach as evident by the success of the 49ners once he was fired? Or was Jesus blessing Vick with the talent and lack of soul to torture and kill helpless animals?

I seems ridiculous and insulting to give credit for the good and withhold it for the bad. Thank god for the gifts of famine, war, and poverty as readily as you thank him for touchdowns and maybe I can become a believer. I guess god is very busy watching football and in particular making sure Tim Tebow has a good game rather than taking care of bigger issues.



"I guess we should be lucky it's Jesus that we're talking about. If it were Mohammed and these kinds of comments were being posted, y'all would be heading into the annual American infidel feast of overindulgence with Excedrin-sized fatwas hanging over all y'all's heads.
"

The fact it is Jesus Tebow is praising, is the only reason he is given as much opportunity to do it. If he were praising Alla so often and publicly, I seriously doubt he would get to play much for the Broncos. Also I wonder how Tebow himself would feel if his receivers were thanking Alla for perfect passes falling out of the sky into their hands, even if Tebow believes those passes are guided by Jesus.

posted by Atheist at 05:07 PM on November 22

Shout it from the mountaintop:

The Broncos have just released Kyle Orton.

Will the other team of horses accept him as their savior?

posted by beaverboard at 06:30 PM on November 22

Will the other team of horses accept him as their savior?

The Lions?

posted by NoMich at 07:34 PM on November 22

As an atheist and a Buckeye I don't particularly care for Tebow, but I think Plummer is out of line with these comments. By all accounts Tebow is a stand-up guy who handles himself well. While he might lay the 'Jesus' thing on a little thick, and it might be a little annoying to some, Tebow should be praised for how he conducts himself in front of the media, however idiosyncratic he may be. It's none of Plummer's business.

posted by mikemacman at 08:00 PM on November 22

I get annoyed when players thank God for their on the field success because I don't think God cares about something so trivial, but I'm not that annoyed. If that's who they want to credit for their success, that's their prerogative. They earned the privilege of that spotlight and they get to do what they want with it. I don't find Tebow annoying mostly because he seems sincere and I can't really fault him for that.

posted by insomnyuk at 08:11 PM on November 22

I know a dozen people like Tebow who thank Jesus every third sentence. Nice people for the most part. It always sounds to me like a fancy way of saying "um, um."

posted by Joey Michaels at 08:33 PM on November 22

How is it out of line for Plummer to express his personal distaste for Tebow's constant evangelism? Tebow makes it everyone's business, presumably because his church compels its members to spread the Word and convert others.

I like the guy because he's a local hero and I've yet to hear a bad thing about his personal conduct, but I can't blame people for thinking enough already with the Jesus stuff.

posted by rcade at 09:45 PM on November 22

It neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg. But taking the piss out of him does neither to him.

posted by etagloh at 11:33 PM on November 22

Just once I'd like to see Tebow start by thanking a teammate ... like the receiver who chased down his puss armed heave to keep the final drive alive last game, the linemen who know they need to win every battle for the offense to have any chance with Tebow at QB, or the defense that knows if they allow more than 17 points in a game they have no chance of winning.

I admire the guy's heart, but his persona far outweighs any admiration to the point his act makes most people want to puke.

posted by cixelsyd at 12:20 AM on November 23

Clearly God is infinite but doesn't have enough time for football.

posted by phaedon at 12:26 AM on November 23

Just take the time to watch the interview in rcades link, cixelysd. The one he linked to regarding regarding tebow's response.

posted by tselson at 12:38 AM on November 23

The major thing rcade's link confirms to me is that I cannot stand Skip Bayless.

posted by Mr Bismarck at 01:10 AM on November 23

I wish Tebow would take Matthew 6:5 a little more to heart.

posted by stevis at 07:33 AM on November 23

To continue with apoch's point. It's fine to tell Jesus that you love him every day, hell even every ten minutes, if that's what you want to do. It's just not necessary to do so in a public forum, or with a bullhorn.

If you tell Jesus that you love him in a public forum, or with a bullhorn, you're not talking to Jesus. You're talking to your audience. You're not saying, "Thank you, Jesus," you're saying, "All you people, look at me and admire me because I'm saying 'Thank you, Jesus'." It's just another TMI violation if you ask me.

posted by lil_brown_bat at 08:09 AM on November 24

I personally don't have a problem with Tebow and his religious convictions since he's always seemed to be very committed to his faith. I have a bigger problem with athletes who suddenly become religious after they have a big game/performance, and then go on to celebrate at the nearest strip club. Tebow is probably astute enough to realize his time in the spotlight may be fleeting, especially with John Elway and everyone else in the Denver organization rooting against him, so he will use the time to spread the word.

My bigger issue is why I should give one shit what the hell Jake Plummer thinks. I'd sooner listen to the opinions of Craig Morton.

And for anyone who has seen the old basketball movie "One On On" that starred Robbie Benson, doesn't Fox and/or Elway remind you of the coach on that college team who spent the season running Benson's character down in an attempt to get him to give up his scholarship? Benson, of course, winds up leading the team to their biggest win, and the coach then loves him. Part of me would like to see Tebow continue to win and ultimately tell Elway (who's an egotistical jackass), "All the way with a red-hot poker. I can play anywhere I want to."

Won't happen but I can dream.

posted by dyams at 09:39 AM on November 24

I have a bigger problem with athletes who suddenly become religious after they have a big game/performance, and then go on to celebrate at the nearest strip club.

Something about Jesus working with prostitutes, but oh, never mind.

posted by owlhouse at 11:51 PM on November 24

Kneeling in private is a sign of humility; kneeling on the sidelines in front of a stadium with 75,000 people and a TV audience of millions of people is not. "And when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites are: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men."

posted by kirkaracha at 05:22 PM on November 28

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