FanDuel - WFBC

August 04, 2010

Yankees' Alex Rodriguez hits 600th career home run: Alex Rodriguez became the seventh - and youngest - major league player to hit 600 home runs, reaching the milestone Wednesday at Yankee Stadium against the Blue Jays

posted by BornIcon to baseball at 02:27 PM - 65 comments

Will A-Rod be the last Club 600 member?

posted by BornIcon at 02:28 PM on August 04

But he didn't hit it in the bottom of the ninth of Game 7 of the World Series at both Old and New Yankee Stadiums with Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, and Mickey Mantle watching. Therefore, not a True YankeeTM.

posted by DrJohnEvans at 02:37 PM on August 04

I'm diggin' the snarkiness Doc.

posted by BornIcon at 03:00 PM on August 04

Shouldn't that say "Yankees' Alex Rodriguez hits 600th* career home run"?

posted by Demophon at 03:25 PM on August 04

DrJohnEvans is right. It wasn't an "ultimate game" so it doesn't count.

posted by apoch at 03:25 PM on August 04

Yankees' Alex Rodriguez hits 600th* career home run

posted by irunfromclones at 04:06 PM on August 04

Yankees' Alex Rodriguez hits 449th allegedly non-tainted career home run

posted by graymatters at 04:33 PM on August 04

Will A-Rod be the last Club 600 member?

Yes, he will. Just like Nolan Ryan Roger Clemens Greg Maddux Tom Glavine Randy Johnson was the last 300 win pitcher.

posted by grum@work at 05:04 PM on August 04

According to ESPN, Stephen Strasburg will be the next to 600 HRs, to go along will his 600 pitching wins, 500 TD passes, and 200 shutouts in goal...

posted by MeatSaber at 05:16 PM on August 04

In addition to the youngest, A-Roid is also the douchiest to reach 600 HR. Congrats, you steroid-ingesting, woman-hipped, whiny ass mutt!

posted by The_Black_Hand at 06:20 PM on August 04

Tell us how you really feel...TBH...don't hold anything back...

posted by wildbill1 at 07:09 PM on August 04

ARod may be the youngest, but Ruth reached 600 in fewer games; and that includes spending the first part of his career primarily as a pitcher in the deadball era and having seasons with 8 fewer games a year. Not sure how many games the other 600 HR members took.

posted by graymatters at 07:43 PM on August 04

In addition to the youngest, A-Roid is also the douchiest to reach 600 HR. Congrats, you steroid-ingesting, woman-hipped, whiny ass mutt!

I'll second that (*) - congrats, AFraud.

Not sure how many games the other 600 HR members took

Pretty certain they took less PEDS to reach 600 as well.

posted by cixelsyd at 08:27 PM on August 04

A-Roid is also the douchiest to reach 600 HR. Congrats, you steroid-ingesting, woman-hipped, whiny ass mutt!

I'll second that (*) - congrats, AFraud.

Hurrr hurrr durrr.

Pretty certain they took less PEDS to reach 600 as well.

Oh really?

Willie Mays used "greenies", the PED of the day during his time.
Sammy Sosa has been accused of using steroids.
Barry Bonds reached 600 HR in 2002, and he's been accused of using steroids.

posted by grum@work at 08:37 PM on August 04

Barry Bonds reached 600 HR in 2002, and he's been accused of using steroids

Also been accused of being a bit of a douche. Not such an open and shut case for ARod.

posted by tahoemoj at 09:09 PM on August 04

Also been accused of being a bit of a douche. Not such an open and shut case for ARod.

Oh come on, man...don't you remember those Radio Shack commercials he did with Daisy Fuentes? And now you're going to defend him?! You've changed, man...

posted by The_Black_Hand at 09:54 PM on August 04

On my score card:

ARod - douche^9
Bonds - douche^2
Sosa - douche..ish

Mays - douche-NOT

posted by cixelsyd at 11:23 PM on August 04

Typical Spofite: never happy unless pissing in a punch bowl.

(I'll have to remember this the next time some athlete hits some milestone...I'm definitely not holding up the side)

posted by lil_brown_bat at 07:56 AM on August 05

Remember it the next time some athlete whose reputation has been tainted hits a milestone. A-Rod's problem isn't so much his PED use but his absolute tone-deafness.

posted by yerfatma at 08:32 AM on August 05

And if A-Roid wasn't a Yankee, l_b_b wouldn't have lifted a finger to defend him. You are as transparent as scotch tape.

posted by The_Black_Hand at 12:05 PM on August 05

600th*

Oh, FFS, really? It continually amazes me that people simply don't understand the wide spectrum of steroid use. On the one side, you've got guys like Bonds, McGwire, Sosa, Giambi, and Canseco, who pumped a lot of shit in their asses and completely altered their appearance while breaking records.

Then you've got guys like Arod, who admitted to using steroids while in Texas, but whose numbers aren't out of whack with his career trend. Are you going to tell me that there wasn't rampant use of "healing creams" and pills to help players get through the wear and tear of a season (not unlike greenies in decades past)? That's some serious denial.

And this somehow makes him a fraud or a douche?

Is it that he's just not a Nice Guy? Dude has a fucked up family dynamic and is thrust into superstardom and mega-money at age 25. I'm willing to cut him some slack. I don't need him to be my friend, I want him to hit the ball out of the park and gun a bullseye to first after making a diving stop.

Moreover, I can't believe anyone in their right mind would judge Arod in any kind of harsher light than Sammy Sosa, who so obviously juiced his way into the record books yet continues to deny deny deny, and who was caught using a corked bat in a major league game.

posted by MKUltra at 12:05 PM on August 05

Is it that he's just not a Nice Guy?

Yes, I would say that's pretty much it in terms of how baseball fans in general treat him. As you suggest, Sosa got away with a lot worse (as far as I can tell), but did it with a smile and seemed to enjoy the game and be grateful for the opportunity. A-Rod . . . my mother would say, "Blow on the personality meter." The complete lack of affect, whatever its source, is off-putting. Even before he put on pinstripes.

posted by yerfatma at 12:31 PM on August 05

but did it with a smile and seemed to enjoy the game and be grateful for the opportunity

Want to talk about fraudulent? Aside from being a blatant, unrepentant cheater, Sosa:

- Stopped caring about playing hard once his career took the slightest downturn.

- Blared salsa in the Cubs clubhouse like he owned the place.

- Left Wrigley Field before the game ended during his last game as a Cub.

Fuck Sammy Sosa. You can't smile that kind of behavior away.

posted by MKUltra at 01:02 PM on August 05

On the one side, you've got guys like Bonds, McGwire, Sosa, Giambi, and Canseco, who pumped a lot of shit in their asses and completely altered their appearance while breaking records.

Why is it an important distinction that their body changed? A-Rod admitted to using, so obviously body changes are not a reliable indication of steroid use.

posted by bperk at 01:10 PM on August 05

I'm not saying Sosa was any better, I'm just addressing why there's a gap in perception. This NYT article says it all much better.

posted by yerfatma at 01:22 PM on August 05

Why is it an important distinction that their body changed? A-Rod admitted to using, so obviously body changes are not a reliable indication of steroid use.

I'm drawing a line between a smaller group of guys who abused steroids to turn themselves into different (stronger) players, and a wider group of players who used them as a conditioning cheat to keep their bodies from breaking down. Not to excuse either situation, but I think there's a significant difference.

posted by MKUltra at 01:34 PM on August 05

I don't see why the distinction matters at all if you think steroids helps a player hit home runs. Plus, it is impossible to divine a players intentions based on perceived weight gain.

posted by bperk at 02:10 PM on August 05

My own impression is "Big Whoop!", who the hell cares what A-Rod does, since any record he might have is tainted. His pathetic attempts at unethical on-field tactics (knocking the ball out of a fielder's glove, calling for a pop-up while running the bases) are what really sets my teeth on edge. But this piece on why no one should care is much better written than most of us can accomplish.

posted by Howard_T at 03:07 PM on August 05

I don't see why the distinction matters at all if you think steroids helps a player hit home runs.

Look at the year to year OPS of Arod, then look at it for guys like McGwire, Sosa, and Giambi. One is fairly steady. The others have serious peaks in the late 90's that then quickly return to earlier levels.

Of course steroids can help you hit home runs. But there are plenty of other uses for a growth hormone that don't involve hulking out.

posted by MKUltra at 04:08 PM on August 05

A-Rod could single-handedly save the human race and people on this site would still despise him. I still can't explain it. With the exception of his use of PEDs, he doesn't even come close to being a dick in the same category as countless numbers of athletes of the present and past. Knocking the ball from a players glove or calling for a pop-up while on the bases? Find anyone who has played baseball at a high level and never been a victim of those type of acts. His marriage falls apart? Please. There are more high-profile athletes in that category than those who aren't. He comes across poorly in interviews? The guy grew up to play baseball, and, unfortunately part of playing in the majors is having to answer inane questions by asshole writers. I don't see a lot of his current teammates bitching and moaning about him being a "douche" like so many of you, who obviously know him well and spend a great deal of time with him, do. Stop expecting A-Rod's personality, and personal life, to be some huge, positive influence on your own. At the end of the day, all he is really guilty of is signing a gigantic contract no athlete could ever dream of living up to, playing for the Yankees, and doing what Major League Baseball really wanted him to do: Perform at a high level and hit home runs.

posted by dyams at 04:23 PM on August 05

A-Rod could single-handedly save the human race and people on this site would still despise him. I still can't explain it.

What's to explain? You've listed the reasons why people don't like him. It's not that complicated. In all the years he's been in baseball, I can count the times he's done something likable on no hands.

That doesn't make him the worst guy ever, absent the other stuff like using PEDs, but athletes need to be likable on some level to be liked. Who likes A-Rod? We are 31 comments into this discussion, and there isn't a single person who seems to like him. Yankees fans and others are critical of how he's being talked about here, but there hasn't been a single comment about liking the guy or being super-excited that he reached this milestone. I think this comment sums it up: " I don't need him to be my friend."

The times I've read magazine-style profiles of A-Rod, he always sounds like a self-fascinated bore with a large sense of entitlement. I was not surprised he made out with himself for a magazine photo.

So do I like him? Nope. I've been watching his athletic accomplishments with interest -- 600 is a big deal -- but I don't identify with them at all.

posted by rcade at 05:10 PM on August 05

I think the truth is that 600 homers has lost a lot of context. I don't know how to think about it anymore. A-Rod is an admitted user (who only admitted after it was headed to the press at SI). How much, how often is a matter of some debate. He hasn't failed any drug test. My gut suggests not to include him in the Bonds, Sosa, McGwire category, but certainly not in the "clean" category either. So many of the top guys are from this steroid era, and A-Rod had his best power hitting years in the middle of it when he admitted to using.

It doesn't mean that I don't appreciate his talent, ability, or effort (he isn't a dogger), it just means I have a hard time deciding where he is in the pantheon. But if he never used PEDs, he'd be a lot higher.

And grum, there is a mile of difference between a greenie and a steroid.

posted by WeedyMcSmokey at 05:45 PM on August 05

there hasn't been a single comment about liking the guy or being super-excited that he reached this milestone.

I like A-Rod as a player, and I'm not all that excited about him hitting number 600 due to the fact I expect big things from him. He has been a tremendously talented player for years and years, so him achieving huge numbers is no big surprise. My point is that all the "douche" comments don't ring as accurate, but merely people choosing to jump on the "hater" bandwagon. And this isn't really the PED thing. I see, for example, Brett Favre as a much more, gigantic douche than A-Rod, for being things I despise such as a selfish, bad teammate. I truly think young kids and Yankee fans are the ones who still appreciate A-Rod overall, but they don't see the need to go blabbing on and on about it on this type of thread, knowing they'll immediately be piled on.

posted by dyams at 06:02 PM on August 05

I think the truth is that 600 homers has lost a lot of context.

I think this is it. A lot of people don't like Rodriguez. So take away the magic of the number and you're just left with the player, and Arod is not well like by a lot of fans. Nothing to really compete with that (without oohs and ahhs over the number).

And grum, there is a mile of difference between a greenie and a steroid.

Oh no, we've been there. Other than saying an advantage is an advantage, I would guess that a high percentage of players that would pop pills would also take PEDs if they had been available.

posted by justgary at 06:23 PM on August 05

I see, for example, Brett Favre as a much more, gigantic douche than A-Rod, for being things I despise such as a selfish, bad teammate.

And he's not well liked here.

I truly think young kids and Yankee fans are the ones who still appreciate A-Rod overall

Because he plays for the Yankees. What if he played for the Red Sox? He would be absolutely hated. There would be no appreciation.

As a Red Sox fan, I try to be fair. I actually don't hate Arod. I also don't believe he's very likeable, and if he wasn't a yankee, I don't think many would find him likeable either.

posted by justgary at 06:29 PM on August 05

Oh no, we've been there. Other than saying an advantage is an advantage, I would guess that a high percentage of players that would pop pills would also take PEDs if they had been available.

In intent, yes, it's the same, but I'm talking about the numbers. Numbers from the great greenie era of the 60s-70s don't look much different from numbers from greenie free eras relative to the Steroid era. Steroid era numbers are fucking cartoons. Barry Bonds numbers from his fucking early 40s make him seem not real. Hundreds of years from now, people will assume they are typos, or a disgruntled employee fucked with the archives.

I do think one offers much more of an advantage than the other. Drink a couple red bulls and you've recreated the effects of a greenie. It's an amphetamine. Steroids have more impact than a couple red bulls.

posted by WeedyMcSmokey at 07:12 PM on August 05

Steroid era numbers are fucking cartoons.

Comparing eras isn't only about steroids. There's huge differences in pay, training, equipment (including baseballs being used), etc. I agree with the sentiments shared earlier: If yesterday's players had been playing for the same huge contracts and salaries as today's players, and had the knowledge of how steroids could give them a possible leg-up, they would have used also. They used greenies to get an advantage, and just because it may not have resulted in homers still doesn't mean it's not cheating.

posted by dyams at 09:31 PM on August 05

Steroid era numbers are fucking cartoons.

Batting numbers or pitching numbers? Because, you know, more pitchers have been suspended for PED use than batters.

In all the years he's been in baseball, I can count the times he's done something likable on no hands.

Really? Just because you don't want to remember, or because it didn't get enough press?

He gave up his starting position at the 2001 All-Star game so Cal Ripken could play there in his final appearance. It happened during live TV at an All-Star game. I guess it slipped your mind.

He donated almost $4million to the University of Miami to renovate their baseball stadium. Of course, that doesn't jive with his "greedy" personality, being the highest paid player in history, so no need to know about it.

He didn't make a peep about moving to third base when he came to the Yankees, even though he was a much better fielder at that position than Jeter. As we know, he had to do it because that's what players do all the time, give up their position without complaining.

He saved a kid from getting hit by a truck.

posted by grum@work at 10:18 PM on August 05

They used greenies to get an advantage, and just because it may not have resulted in homers still doesn't mean it's not cheating.

I've said this before, but from personal what I've heard drinking two red bulls is nothing close to using amphetamines. But I agree with your general point.

He donated almost $4million to the University of Miami to renovate their baseball stadium. Of course, that doesn't jive with his "greedy" personality, being the highest paid player in history, so no need to know about it.

That was generous. And he got nothing from it other than the satisfaction of doing good and having the facility named the ALEX RODRIGUEZ PARK.

He didn't make a peep about moving to third base when he came to the Yankees, even though he was a much better fielder at that position than Jeter. As we know, he had to do it because that's what players do all the time, give up their position without complaining.

Oh come on. What player has gone to another team and demanded that they take the position of an all star that also happens to be one of the teams most popular players of all time?

Arod's best chance at winning was going to the Yankees. That's what he did. He would have had to be a moron to demand to take Jeter's place. And while he may have been a better shortstop then, he wouldn't be today. His bodies changed and he's no longer a shortstop. I wouldn't be surprised if he knew his days at shortstop were numbered.

I doubt Arods ego is any larger than a lot of other stars. He's just tone deaf and awkward. I agree that his transgressions are overblown, but I'm not sure giving him credit for what a normal player in his shoes would do is any better.

posted by justgary at 11:15 PM on August 05

Oh come on. What player has gone to another team and demanded that they take the position of an all star that also happens to be one of the teams most popular players of all time?

Not many stars get traded to teams with a star in that position, but many players have complained about being forced to switch positions. For example, how about the reigning MVP being moved to the DH position?

The point is, he didn't make a peep about it.

I wouldn't be surprised if he knew his days at shortstop were numbered.

He was a the reigning 2-time AL Gold Glove winner at shortstop the season before the trade? How many "best fielders" at ANY position think their "days were numbered" at that position the year they win the award? And he was 27 years old at the time.

posted by grum@work at 11:46 PM on August 05

The point is, he didn't make a peep about it.

I'd say the point is that he agreed to be paid $275,000,000.00 in "hush," money.

posted by tselson at 12:21 AM on August 06

A-Rod could single-handedly save the human race and people on this site would still despise him.

There is no way a centaur could single handedly save the world.

posted by tselson at 12:30 AM on August 06

There is no way a centaur could single handedly save the world.

On the other hand, he could do it four-leggedly.

posted by apoch at 04:43 AM on August 06

I'd say the point is that he agreed to be paid $275,000,000.00 in "hush," money.

Um, what?

He was being paid that money before he went to the Yankees. They didn't give him that deal, it was the Rangers. Whether he got traded or not, he was going to get that money.

posted by grum@work at 08:08 AM on August 06

I like A-Rod as a player

I think you just made rcade's point for him. Even you qualified your like for A-Rod. Hell, I think everyone here likes him as a player. No one would block a trade of A-Rod to their team (well, maybe this year when his numbers are in the dumper, relatively speaking).

posted by yerfatma at 08:59 AM on August 06

Just because you don't want to remember, or because it didn't get enough press?

Because they didn't make an impression. Aside from the one about saving the kid from a truck and the position switch, they're not particularly memorable. You make a good point on the former, but the latter doesn't seem all that laudatory to me. He switched positions.

I also don't believe he's very likeable, and if he wasn't a yankee, I don't think many would find him likeable either.

I'm a Rangers fan. I wanted to like him when he played in Texas, of course, but didn't find a reason to.

posted by rcade at 09:16 AM on August 06

My point is that all the "douche" comments don't ring as accurate, but merely people choosing to jump on the "hater" bandwagon.

There are plenty of reasons to dislike A-Rod without being a hater. I started disliking him after he carried on about how much he wanted to stay in Seattle and be a part of a winning team, but instead took a contract that was so large it dwarfed any previous MLB contract and devastated the team's chance of winning. What kind of sport fan would like that? Plus, he admitted to using PEDs for years after a book was about to be published detailing that information.

posted by bperk at 09:55 AM on August 06

No one would block a trade of A-Rod to their team

Completely disagree. He was an arrogant classless douche long before he became a Yankee or was caught using 'roids. I really think the Yankees are the only team that can handle his overhead - salary and otherwise.

posted by cixelsyd at 10:30 AM on August 06

I can count the times he's done something likable on no hands.

What, exactly, is the kind of behavior you're looking for here to qualify as "likable"?

He doesn't hog the limelight. He speaks well of his teammates in post-game interviews. I don't think I've ever heard him speak poorly of another player on the record.

Unless your definition of "likable" is so extreme as to only include hyper-gregarious guys like his teammate Nick Swisher, I don't know what you're bar you're expecting him to hit.

Regarding his move to 3rd: It was a bigger thing than people are giving him credit for. Yes, Jeter was captain and Face Of The Yankees. But he was not, at that point, a good defensive shortstop. We all love his beautifully acrobatic throws so much that we ignore they covered up his lack of range. Arod, meanwhile, was (and still is) a much better defensive player- arguably the best at the position. Of course he had to defer as a matter of politics, but he did in a graceful, low-key way that deserves respect.

One last thing- Arod may have a large ego, and clearly has issues with family, identity, image, and who knows what else, but he has been up front about using therapy to help him deal with his personal struggles. It was a brave statement in support of something many consider a sign of weakness.

posted by MKUltra at 11:50 AM on August 06

What, exactly, is the kind of behavior you're looking for here to qualify as "likable"?

I like athletes who don't take themselves too seriously, can interact well with the media and care about their team, teammates and the community. I don't like them to cheat or make a big public show of their own greatness, the way LeBron just big-timed the world with "The Decision." I like athletes who never forget they're just a common person gifted with an extremely uncommon talent. The ones who get swallowed by their own ego, like Jose Canseco, seem like pathetic and miserable people.

I like Tony Romo, who has always acted like it was a hilarious accident he became the Cowboys starting quarterback. He constantly goofs with reporters.

I also like athletes who take losses as hard as I did when I was 12 years old. Clint Dempsey's utter despondency after the U.S. soccer team lost the Confederations Cup last year made me a fan for life.

With A-Rod, I've already said he doesn't seem like the "worst guy ever." There's just not much there I find worth liking.

If I've brought out a few people from hiding who genuinely like the guy, great. I hope you enjoyed his 600th homerun.

posted by rcade at 12:13 PM on August 06

I hope you enjoyed his 600th homerun.

I definitely enjoyed it because no one caught the ball and then tried to hold it for ransom.

posted by grum@work at 12:20 PM on August 06

Not many stars get traded to teams with a star in that position

I don't think you're going to find many comparable situations to going to a team with not only an all star at your position, but the face of the organization, a guy with 4 WS rings.

If you want to give him credit for not demanding short, fine. I think it points more to the fact that he's not a complete moron.

How many "best fielders" at ANY position think their "days were numbered" at that position the year they win the award? And he was 27 years old at the time.

You really don't think he knew how his body was changing? That he was getting bulkier? He looks nothing like the shortstop he once was, and that didn't happen over night.

At the time I'm sure he thought he was the better fielder. But with his body type, and approaching 30, I have little doubt he knew his future was at 3rd (as I'm sure his agent knew as wel), much like Miguel Tejada who is only a year older.

Again, I'm giving credit to Arod for realizing demanding a move to short when Jeter would probably be a longer, better fit (typical SS body, batting stats more shortstop like than 3rd) at the position would be a long term mistake.

I just think it points to Arod being smart about his future more than anything else.

Arod, meanwhile, was (and still is) a much better defensive player- arguably the best at the position.

Arod is not a good defensive third baseman, and no where close to being the best at his position.

posted by justgary at 12:34 PM on August 06

Arod, meanwhile, was (and still is) a much better defensive player- arguably the best at the position

Seconding Gary. A-Rod was a fantastic shortstop. He was an ok third baseman when he moved over. He's gotten worse with age.

posted by yerfatma at 12:50 PM on August 06

They didn't give him that deal, it was the Rangers

They (Yankees) did give him that deal.

Which some argue may turn out to be the worst deal ever.

The Rangers were stupid (in hindsight) in giving him the first deal, they still owe him money. The Yankees were the only team who were foolish enough to give him the second deal. No one was going to pay him that money to play shortstop but he could make that money playing third for the Yankees.

posted by tselson at 02:21 PM on August 06

He's a terrible third baseman now. Who is making this shit up? My god, just this week the Jays hit six doubles in one inning and three of them went right by him.

posted by WeedyMcSmokey at 06:47 PM on August 06

They didn't give him that deal, it was the Rangers

They (Yankees) did give him that deal.

You were referring to "hush money", in reference to him not complaining about moving to 3B. He'd received the deal from Texas before moving to New York. Therefore, if referencing "hush money", no, the Yankees did NOT give him any.

Which some argue may turn out to be the worst deal ever.

Which, of course, is fucking ridiculous to state and why "Bleacher Report" is a silly site (fan contributed articles). Remember the "Whitey Ford" article that was posted here earlier?

Alfonso Soriano: $132million over 8 seasons - 110 OPS+ so far, and he's already 34 years old

Chan Ho Park: $63million over 5 seasons - 83 ERA+

Vernon Wells: $126million over 7 seasons - 102 OPS+ so far since signing the extension, and he's got 4 more years to go.

Carlos Lee: $100million over 6 seasons - currently putting up an 83 OPS+, with 2 more years to go

Barry Zito: $126million over 7 seasons - 102 ERA+ so far, with 3 more years to go.

Even with his down year so far (which is still better than $18million/year Jeter), he's managed a 140 OPS+ since signing the deal. He was also the driving force for the Yankees to get to and win the World Series in 2009.

posted by grum@work at 06:55 PM on August 06

You were referring to "hush money", in reference to him not complaining about moving to 3B. He'd received the deal from Texas before moving to New York. Therefore, if referencing "hush money", no, the Yankees did NOT give him any.

From the first two paragraphs of the 1st crappy ass article I linked to:

A-Rod set the previous mark with his $252 million, 10-year deal with Texas in December 2000. Traded to the Yankees in 2004, he opted out of that contract Oct. 28, (2007) during the final game of the World Series.

I'll repeat because you are ignoring the point I was trying to make:

No one was going to pay him that money to play shortstop but he could make that money playing third for the Yankees.

"hush," is tongue in cheek. chelax a little. I'm saying it's a little easier not to complain about switching to third when you are making more money doing that than playing shortstop somewhere else.

Which, of course, is fucking ridiculous to state and why "Bleacher Report" is a silly site (fan contributed articles). Remember the "Whitey Ford" article that was posted here earlier?

I didn't think that this article from the Bleacher Report was that bad, sorry.

Do you ever leave work?

posted by tselson at 07:52 PM on August 06

Regarding Arod's contract, he's certainly put up great numbers up to now. This year has certainly been down. Don't look for Arod's name. It isn't there.

He's older, has a hip problem, and he's signed through 2017 (age 42?). Maybe he'll continue to put up numbers deserving of 20 million (or more) a year for that time. Or maybe he'll follow what other sluggers have done and slowly lose it while being a below average 3rd baseman. The yankees are the only team willing to find out, and the only ones that can afford to.

The Jeter comparison is a red herring. He was signed as much for him to continue being a yankee, and the face of the yankees, as anything else.

It's just too early to tell, but Arods contract has a chance to be god awful long after most of the contracts grum referenced are forgotten.

posted by justgary at 01:28 PM on August 07

The Jeter comparison is a red herring. He was signed as much for him to continue being a yankee, and the face of the yankees, as anything else.

How is that a good thing? Imagine the fun this winter, when the Yankees sign him to another big money deal, after coming off the worst full season of his career.

And it's not like any other team is going to be bidding against the Yankees for his services. Everyone knows he's signing with them. It'll be just like the ARod deal.

posted by grum@work at 02:13 PM on August 07

How is that a good thing? Imagine the fun this winter, when the Yankees sign him to another big money deal, after coming off the worst full season of his career.

I'm not saying it's a good or bad thing. I'm saying that no one in their right mind believes Jeter is worth his contract statistically. And when he signs a new one he'll still be overpaid. He's an anomaly, and it's the Yankees choice to over pay a player simply because they want him to be a life time yankee.

So I don't believe there's great value in comparing his contract with Arods (nor anyone else's for that matter).

I'm not calling Arod's contract a bad one. I'm saying that he's a 35 year old slugger who's an average fielder with a bad hip. He's due 31 million next year, 29 million in 2012, 28 million in 2013, 25 million in 2014, 21 million in 2015, and 20 million for his last 2 years (41 and 42 years old).

I'm saying it has the potential to be a very bad contract for several years, and I'm not sure how you would argue differently.

posted by justgary at 07:46 PM on August 07

A-Rod on his injury: "It looked like a scene from Platoon . . . Jeter and Teixeira were making fun of me back there, like I went down for the count. I'm glad they all got a great laugh out of it."

No idea why people don't like this guy.

posted by yerfatma at 09:02 AM on August 08

There's an interesting exchange in the Times where it appears you got that quote. I thought A-Rod was joking about the injury, but the paper makes it sound like he was being petulant. The audio sounds like he said it for laughs.

posted by rcade at 10:05 AM on August 08

Yeah, I could see how it could go either way and my framing was intentional, but you'd think someone with his media problems would be a little more self-aware. What scene from Platoon does he even mean? Wilhem Defoe with his arms in the air? If so, I hope like hell A-Rod missed the allusion to Christ there.

posted by yerfatma at 04:16 PM on August 08

How is that a good thing? Imagine the fun this winter, when the Yankees sign him to another big money deal, after coming off the worst full season of his career.

I'm not saying it's a good or bad thing. I'm saying that no one in their right mind believes Jeter is worth his contract statistically. And when he signs a new one he'll still be overpaid. He's an anomaly, and it's the Yankees choice to over pay a player simply because they want him to be a life time yankee.


Why some believe Jeter is not overpaid

Could it be there is a similar argument to be made about A Rod and the attention he draws?

posted by MW12 at 06:31 PM on August 08

Why some believe Jeter is not overpaid

That's why I made sure to emphasize 'statistically'.

The author, however, is guessing at what effect the absence of Jeter would have. I mean, his single reason for believing the drop in Red Sox popularity is they're boring is the opinion of one writer he claims is their ultimate fan. Not a whole lot of science going on here.

Would Jeter continue to be a draw if he has below average stats? Would the Yankees maintain their popularity with Jeter at short if they were losing? I would guess that winning is far more important than having Jeter at short. Lucky for the Yankees they can keep Arod around to break the HR record and Jeter for old times and still put 5-7 all stars at the other positions.

Not a whole lot of other teams can afford that luxury.

Jeter is having the worst offensive season of his career. He has been on a bit of a tear the last three weeks or so raising his average from .268 to .279 and pushing his OPS+ over 100 for the first time in a long time. If he keeps that up, he might get his numbers back up to pretty good. But, let's assume that he stays about where he is for the rest of the year league average offensively, with his usual debatable defensive skills (his defensive numbers, after a 2009 spike, are back in the negatives).

This is the easiest decision in Yankee history because it's really no decision they HAVE to bring Jeter back at whatever the cost. There is simply no other option. He is the most popular Yankees player since DiMaggio (and maybe ever), the Yankees are by far the richest team in baseball, he will get his 3,00th hit next year there is simply no way that he will play anywhere else. How they do it can they give Jeter a percentage of the franchise? is only in the details. But they WILL do it.

Again, choosing Jeter's contract compare to anyone elses to prove anything is pointless.

posted by justgary at 01:52 PM on August 10

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