FanDuel - WFBC

July 22, 2009

Rick Reilly: Tiger Woods Should Calm the Bleep Down: After "two days of Tiger Tantrums" at the British Open last weekend, former Sports Illustrated columnist Rick Reilly said that it's time for Tiger Woods to outgrow his temper. "It's disrespectful to the game, disrespectful to those he plays with and disrespectful to the great players who built the game before him. Ever remember Jack Nicklaus doing it? Arnold Palmer? ... Only one great player ever threw clubs as a pro -- Bobby Jones -- and he stopped in his 20s when he realized how spoiled he looked."

posted by rcade to golf at 04:28 PM - 47 comments

I agree that TW's tirades are often a bit much, but coming from Reilly this seems a bit sketchy. It felt like Reilly's column was written to try to find a way to criticize TW. TW's antics have been well known for a while; did he have no better ideas?

posted by brainofdtrain at 04:58 PM on July 22

I agree that it looks childish. But "disrespectful to the game, the other players and former players"??? Besides, who knows maybe the fire inside him that makes him act that way is the reason hes the best golfer. How is is it disrepectful to anyone else when you slam your club down on the ground and curse when you hit a bad shot? what a dumb article.

posted by Underdog at 05:20 PM on July 22

Yeah, I don't really care for the fact it's Reilly doing the talking here, but I do have to agree with much of what is said. Regardless of how dominating Woods has been, and regardless of how successful he'll be in the future (at least when compared to other golfers of the present), I seriously doubt he's immune to the idea of having to change aspects of his game as he ages. When he was younger and golf was pretty much all he had to focus on in his life, I don't think the tantrums were anything he couldn't overcome practically 100 percent of the time. I'm not ever going to be totally convinced he can put these things behind him like that anymore. He's not beyond having to keep the mental part of his game in check in order to play his best golf. I'm not talking about losing his edge by any means. But with his talent, being able to keep his temper at an even level after bad shots and totally concentrate on the shot coming up may keep him from experiencing some of the blow-up rounds he's had lately that have taken him out of contention. I'm not totally convinced all his (for him) struggles are due to his surgery. Many older golfers used to say the true test of Tiger's staying power with regards to his chase to be the all-time leader in Major tournament wins is how he handles life when he's got a wife and kids, not just himself, on his mind.

Plus the tantrums do look more and more stupid the older he gets.

posted by dyams at 05:29 PM on July 22

Rick Reilly no longer writes for Sports Illustrated. He is exclusively with ESPN now. Apparently Bill Simmons is not a big fan of his salary, status and views on "bloggers."

posted by holden at 05:55 PM on July 22

Thanks for the correction.

Woods carries himself with class through most of his life, which makes his occasional tantrums surprising to me. People who rant and rave after a bad shot on the golf course look like chumps. That's true whether you're a weekend duffer trying to score under triple digits or the best player in the game.

posted by rcade at 06:01 PM on July 22

People who rant and rave after a bad shot on the golf course look like chumps.

Except in this case, there is no way that Tiger Woods is a chump. I won't defend his tirades or tantrums in any way whatsoever. But his effectiveness on the golf course is beyond reproach. I would say the good for the game that he has done so far in his career so vastly outweighs any negative attributes he has thusfar displayed as to just about negate any damage.

When he starts going after caddies, other golfers, or spectaors, I think this discussion will have merit. Not that the current discussion is without merit.

Rambling again. Sorry. Gotta check my meds.

posted by THX-1138 at 06:24 PM on July 22

Only one great player ever threw clubs as a pro -- Bobby Jones

Reilly has never heard of Tommy 'Thunder' Bolt, I guess. As funny as the quotes attributed to Bolt are, and as hard as I have laughed over the years seeing my pals throw tantrums on the golf course, I gotta agree with Reilly that it looks just plain boorish when Tiger does it, particularly since he does influence so many of todays younger golfers. For someone who is so strong mentally, it should be a rather minor attitude adjustment for him to learn to handle the bad shots as well as the good with equal aplomb.

posted by mjkredliner at 07:14 PM on July 22

I also have to agree with everyone that Tiger's tantrums are for the most part a bit to much , but its finally happened over the last few years - we have now seen Tiger Woods is human. He is one of the best to ever swing a club , but he has emotions , can be injured and even miss a cut in a major. He will probably beat Jack's record for majors , it just may take a little longer than everyone thought. If I were the rest of golf id take advantage of this because when he gets hot again - look out

posted by elevmn79 at 07:32 PM on July 22

By now Taga should be able to avoid taking it out on the equipment and simply belt out a blue streak in Swedish when things go wrong.

Only a few people would know what he's saying, and when he got off the course, his spouse would be able to soothe his ills with a double measure of aquavit.

Right now his biggest problem is his branding graphics. That TW logo looks like it was done in a military school introductory drafting class in the 1930's.

posted by beaverboard at 08:47 PM on July 22

Sure, it would be nice if Tiger would tone it down a bit, but it seems to me that it is being made a bigger deal than it should be. Most other sport's stars can show anger and people will say emotion is part of the game (God knows how many times I heard that on MNF and such last year), or will just ignore it.

ARod slams the bat while running to first after popping up while up 3-0? Fine.

Tiger slams his club after shanking one into the tall grass and knowing you're likely going to miss the cut at a major? Inexcusable.

Just because golf is a "gentleman's game" doesn't mean that someone can't vent their frustration. Disrespecting the game and former players? Give me a break.

posted by Andy1087 at 12:30 AM on July 23

Tiger has the ability to drill every tee shot right down the pipe and stick every approach tight to the pin - and he knows it. So when he mishits a ball, even by a small margin, he's irritated by it. I understand that.

Now, I don't know Tiger, so my opinion is an assumption, by imagine knowing that you can do something as well as Tiger can play golf, a small mental error would drive you nuts.

I side with Tiger on this one, he's only being human. I see no reason for him to restrain his passion and love for the game in order to appease the old school purists that expect robot-like behavior on the course.

posted by BoKnows at 02:15 AM on July 23

Of course, Bobby Jones was never a pro, but that's beside the point.

posted by trox at 10:24 AM on July 23

I think Rick Reilly is right on with that article....except Bobby Jones was never a professional. He was an amateur his whole career. For those of you who think that Tiger's tantrums don't disrespect the game or the players he's with, then you don't know the game. If you're playing with a club thrower or a constant screamer of profanity(or both), it's embarrassing to watch and be around. And as a role model, he owes it to those who try to emulate his every move to be a "gentleman" and take the bad with the good. There's not a professional golfer (or amateur) out there that doesn't get pissed off - but those who have a proper respect for the game, keep their anger to themselves. i.e Tom Watson. I don't care what "fire" Tiger has burning inside - he needs to get some control. As someone else pointed out, he's mastered everything else about the game, he should have enough discipline to control his on-course antics. Yes, Tommy "Thunder" Bolt was an angry man on the course, but he's not one of the all time greats. Reilly's not suggesting that Tiger's the only one who pounds clubs and cusses, he's just saying that Tiger's more visible than most and as such, he should be aware of that and act accordingly. And yes, the camera is on Tiger more than others, but if you follow Tiger at a tournament, he's always spitting, and cussing and pounding the ground with his clubs.....even if he's way out front. And for those of you who think Rick Reilly isn't a credible source, he's an avid golfer who follows the Tour and has been a sports writer for years. He's caddied a few times for pros during a tour event and knows his way around a golf course just fine. His observations and opinions are as valuable and credible as any sports writer out there.

posted by DvonR at 10:26 AM on July 23

Of course, Bobby Jones was never a pro, but that's beside the point

Actually, that is a point...well, considering I was thinking the same thing. Bobby Jones stayed playing as an amateur because money wasn't the reason as to why he played in the first place. Also, the reason he stopped throwing his clubs was due to him hitting a woman's leg with his club during one of his tirades and swore that he would never lose his temper that way again.

And as a role model, he owes it to those who try to emulate his every move...

Oh ge'ez, here we go now! Next thing you know, people will start screaming, "For the love of God man!! Think about the children!!"

posted by BornIcon at 10:42 AM on July 23

He should think of the children, particularly since he now has two of his own. Would he let them throw tantrums when they play sports? He's not the only golfer who knows how much he screwed up when he hits a bad shot.

posted by rcade at 10:48 AM on July 23

Whatever Tiger is doing, he should keep doing it. If a little temper tantrum is what he needs to get over the last shot and focus on the next, then have at it. Parents can still teach their kids that they shouldn't do it. There are any number of things that adults can do that children cannot. This is one of them. Parents can use it as a teachable lesson that even Tiger Woods has flaws. Kids can learn from the good and reject the bad.

posted by bperk at 11:07 AM on July 23

Parents can still teach their kids that they shouldn't do it.

"Do as I say, not as I do" is lousy parenting. The only thing that teaches a kid is that you don't have to live by your own principles.

posted by rcade at 11:45 AM on July 23

He should think of the children...

I knew that someone would go there..I just didn't think it would be you rcade. You're better than that! That is always the lamest reason that people use when they don't really have a good rebuttal. Think about the kids! Actually, shouldn't the parents be thinking of the kids when they use profanity in front of them? Or what about when they may suffer from road rage? Or drinking alcohol in front of them? Or smoking?

All of those things have happened to parents one time or another but for someone to use the tried and true excuse that athletes should be thinking about the children, give me a break! Some parents don't even think about their kids and will allow them to do just about anything, just as long as they don't have to deal with them.

Summer camp anyone?

posted by BornIcon at 12:12 PM on July 23

For all of you condoning Tiger's actions, the next time your child drops the F-bomb in the grocery store or throws a bat at the ball field, I hope you won't raise a finger or your voice.

You shouldn't hold your children to standards you don't think are attainable by grown-ups.

Or, exactly what rcade said a minute ago. :P

posted by wfrazerjr at 12:21 PM on July 23

One of the most important aspects of sportsmanship to teach a child in sports is how to lose with grace. Throwing clubs, cursing and acting like an asshat when you mishit a golf shot is being a poor sport.

"Think of the children" is overused, but that doesn't mean it isn't directly applicable here. Adults who throw tantrums in sports when things don't go their way are teaching kids that such infantile behavior is allowed. Adults who curse, road rage, drink and smoke in front of their kids are encouraging them to do the same.

The fact that some parents do not think of their kids does not mean that all parents get a pass from being role models. Most parents I know are happy to have the responsibility to lead by example.

Tiger Woods may be the most well-known athlete in the world. If you don't think kids are learning from his occasional tirades, I don't know what to say to you.

posted by rcade at 12:25 PM on July 23

I'll add this also -- yes, as a parent I have every right and responsibility to teach my children to learn from Tiger's poor example, and tell them, "No, you shouldn't do what Tiger does."

But if you're going to back this, can you then also complain about Reilly writing this column? Isn't that talking out of both sides of your mouth?

posted by wfrazerjr at 12:32 PM on July 23

He's a role model and not just for children - but for everyone who tries to be like him.....and believe me, there's a lot of golfers out there who want to be like Tiger - not just children. Aside from being a role model, he represents the PGA and the USGA as all professional golfers do and should act accordingly. Tim Finchem (the head of the PGA) should have a word with him, like Roger Goodell does to professional football players when they set a poor example. Though it's true that Tiger has done a great deal for the Tour, it doesn't give him carte blanche to act like a spoiled brat whenever he hits a poor shot. Again, he's not the only player to behave in such a manner, but he is the most visible and will probably one day be the greatest golfer ever. (until he surpasses Nicklaus in majors, he'll be 2nd best). With greatness come a responsibility to represent yourself and your sport with class and dignity regardless of whether or not you want to.

posted by DvonR at 12:34 PM on July 23

One note: I think Tiger Woods has been an exemplary role model in most of his conduct. When I raised the question about his charitable efforts earlier, I was not one of those who thought he did too little, and I came away from that discussion more impressed by him. It's just these occasional bad-shot tantrums that I question.

posted by rcade at 12:37 PM on July 23

For all of you condoning Tiger's actions, the next time your child drops the F-bomb in the grocery store or throws a bat at the ball field, I hope you won't raise a finger or your voice

And maybe the reason the kid "drops the F-bomb in the grocery store or throws a bat at the ball field" is because the kid is a spoiled brat that needs their ass spanked but the parent let them get away with murder.

Instead of being a parent to their children, parents want to be their friend. This debate can go on & on but I'm not in disagreement that kids emulate their favorite athletes, most do. What I do disagree with is that instead of parents taking responsibilty for the way that their child behaves during sporting events, they want to pass the buck and blame it on an athlete.

Why can't the child just be acting like his or her father that kicks the shit out of the lawnmower while cursing like a sailor because it ran out of gas while swigging down a beer and puffing on a death stick?

It's just these occasional bad-shot tantrums that I question

Fair enough.

posted by BornIcon at 12:39 PM on July 23

Baseball players break bats over their knees, managers come out to argue and use every word in the book. As do umpires. Hockey players. coaches and referees drop f-bombs all game long, break sticks over goal posts and throw water bottles in the penalty box. Much the same can be said for situations in both the NBA and NFL.

But for some reason we want to single out Tiger and give the others a free pass? Or, maybe not a free pass, but we just won't talk about them?

For all of you condoning Tiger's actions, the next time your child drops the F-bomb in the grocery store or throws a bat at the ball field, I hope you won't raise a finger or your voice.

If you don't think kids are learning from his occasional tirades, I don't know what to say to you.

Even with the mindset like mine, which is not using Tiger as the pincushion, parents do still have the ability to teach right from wrong. Just because I don't publicly condemn another adults behavior doesn't make me incapable of instilling manners and ethics in my child.

posted by BoKnows at 12:40 PM on July 23

But for some reason we want to single out Tiger and give the others a free pass?

It seems to me that Tiger's gotten a pass about this for a long time. I can't recall him being called out by as prominent a sportswriter as Reilly before.

posted by rcade at 12:43 PM on July 23

Actually, shouldn't the parents be thinking of the kids when they use profanity in front of them? Or what about when they may suffer from road rage? Or drinking alcohol in front of them? Or smoking?

Of course they should. This only my anecdata, but every friend I know who has had kids has changed their ways. I know I make a conscious effort to be a role model. And that's just not "no cursing or road rage," it's also showing others common courtesy and modeling appropriate behavior for him. (And, no, he's not old enough to read this blog).

Instead of being a parent to their children, parents want to be their friend.

What are you basing this on?

I bet that once Tiger's kids are old enough to understand what he's saying during these outbursts and either call him on it or imitate him, he will stop very quickly.

posted by cjets at 01:00 PM on July 23

Instead of being a parent to their children, parents want to be their friend.

What are you basing this on?

I'm basing it on the fact that some parents do befriend their kids instead of being an actual parent. And please, don't act as if you've never seen, heard or know about parents like that.

I bet that once Tiger's kids are old enough to understand what he's saying during these outbursts and either call him on it or imitate him, he will stop very quickly.

So...what are you basing that on?

posted by BornIcon at 01:11 PM on July 23

Parents can still teach their kids that they shouldn't do it.

"Do as I say, not as I do" is lousy parenting. The only thing that teaches a kid is that you don't have to live by your own principles.

There are all kinds of things that I can and must do as an adult that my child absolutely cannot do. None of those things are inappropriate when I do them, but would be if my child did them. Most of them involve interactions with adults, but they come up in other areas as well. I have had to answer many times about societal norms for children differing from what is required of adults. Also, to the extent that I make mistakes in front of my child, I have no problem apologizing and telling her why that is not nice and I shouldn't have done it. Certainly, I work at being a good model, but letting her know that all people do make mistakes and have flaws (that they need to work on) is fine by me. Parenting also generally requires that you teach your kids that other people do things wrong all the time, but that it is not your problem or your families problem. Your family has your own standards for behavior. Tiger has a responsibility to his own children to explain his behavior, but he doesn't owe any such explanation to my child. That's my job.

posted by bperk at 01:35 PM on July 23

I haven't seen this point brought up yet, but then again I'm not really paying much attention:

There is a lot of talk of the "children". Which children? Were there kids around when Woods lost his cool? And does anyone have any evidence that they were adversely affected?

I have six kids. I don't rely on pro athletes or entertainers to be good examples to them. If I have done my job correctly my kids are smart enough to identify poor behavior and actions that they shouldn't emulate. We might need to give kids more credit than to be so easily manipulated by everything they see.

There is a world of difference between an athlete committing an act of unsportsmanlike conduct like spitting on a ref or fellow player or starting fights and Tiger Woods displaying a perhaps regrettable act of frustration with his own play.

posted by THX-1138 at 01:37 PM on July 23

I have six kids..

Is that what the TH in THX stand for, Mr. Travis Henry?

posted by BornIcon at 01:45 PM on July 23

There are all kinds of things that I can and must do as an adult that my child absolutely cannot do.

Throwing a tantrum on a golf course when your shot goes bad is not, I presume, one of them.

posted by rcade at 02:15 PM on July 23

Throwing a tantrum on a golf course when your shot goes bad is not, I presume, one of them.

No, I would never behave that way in front of my own child. I just don't really care if someone else does it. I appreciate the teachable moments Tiger is providing.

posted by bperk at 03:02 PM on July 23

Good one, BI. My family was like the Spanish Inquisition: Nobody expected it.

Throwing a tantrum on a golf course when your shot goes bad is not, I presume, one of them.

To be fair, neither is paying taxes, getting a job, drinking legally, driving a car, and engaging in sexual congress. Children and adults are absolutely held to different standards of behavior and activity.

posted by THX-1138 at 03:04 PM on July 23

I think the writer has a point, but if I was the guy in contention against Tiger, I'd be delighted to see it all day long. When he's at his best - win, lose or draw - he doesn't do it, so if he's lobbing clubs and swearing, that means the rest of them have a decent chance of winning that week.

Otherwise, I'm in no position to comment, as the worst fits of temper I've ever witnessed on the golf course have been my own. I'm not as bad as I used to be, but getting better has been more like breaking a habit and less to do with what's at stake these days (i.e., nothing).

For what little it's worth, I think it's usually the guys with the most natural talent that get the most angry. Tom Weiskopf was prodigiously talented and lost his temper all the time. The way he summed it up always rang true to me - and fits the Tiger model - when you know you can hit a perfect shot, anything less can only be frustrating, no matter where it ends up.

I think it's perhaps disingenuous to say that Tiger does it more than anyone else out there - he doesn't, he just gets more coverage - but otherwise, the writer's point is a good one - he ought to grow up a bit. Not because he should be a father to all the world's children, but just because he looks increasingly like an arse.

posted by JJ at 03:10 PM on July 23

My family was like the Spanish Inquisition: Nobody expected it.

May we start calling you Pedro Berruguete then?

posted by BornIcon at 03:37 PM on July 23

Tiger being the best golfer in the world obviously gives him the right to act however he wants on the course, and to hell with the long-accepted decorum of the game itself, right? So why can't fans decide they want to throw out the "gentleman's game" crap he only follows when it suits how his game is going and hoot, holler, throw shit, scream, whatever, during the entire tournament, like when a basketball player is at the free-throw line and fans can do anything in their power to distract them? He should have to follow the same, accepted practices as the rest of the tour. And to hell with the "role model" stuff. He should do it because it's the right thing to do out of respect for the game, realizing there were great golfers before him (believe it or not).

posted by dyams at 03:53 PM on July 23

I'm basing it on the fact that some parents do befriend their kids instead of being an actual parent. And please, don't act as if you've never seen, heard or know about parents like that.

You made a blanket statement that parents want to be their friend.. I see now that you're quickly backtracking by saying "some" parents want to be their kid's friend. Had you said that the first time, I never would have responded.

I bet that once Tiger's kids are old enough to understand what he's saying during these outbursts and either call him on it or imitate him, he will stop very quickly.

So...what are you basing that on?

The embarrassment I feel when I screw up around my kids. And unlike you, I'm not making a blanket statement.

Your opinion seems to be that the people/parents who are critical of Tiger should be worrying about themselves first. Fine, I can agree with that. Parents are or should be the primary influence in their kid's life. It's a big responsibility.

But you take it well past the point of reason when you say: That is always the lamest reason that people use when they don't really have a good rebuttal.

There's a reason for movie and TV ratings. Kids are impressionable young sponges who soak up everything. Everything. My son doesn't watch golf but I can understand why a parent who tries to teach his kid not to swear and not to throw temper tantrums and then they see the most famous golfer (and possibly athlete) screaming Fuck on tv and throwing a temper tantrum, could get upset about it.

It's something one sees in the film industry alot (see Christian Bale). and I wonder how those of you who condone Tiger's actions felt when they heard Bale's temper tantrum.

posted by cjets at 04:24 PM on July 23

I have six kids. I don't rely on pro athletes or entertainers to be good examples to them. If I have done my job correctly my kids are smart enough to identify poor behavior and actions that they shouldn't emulate. We might need to give kids more credit than to be so easily manipulated by everything they see.

I agree with most of that. But in raising my kids, part of what I need to do is shield them from inappropriate subject matter (and we're talking young children in my case). They can't watch Sopranos or Entourage. They can't watch "R" rated movies, etc. So I can understand why a parent doesn't want his kid to see Tiger screaming "fuck" and throwing a temper tantrum.

Personally, it's really not that big a deal to me but when I see people saying that the only reason parents do this is because they can't parent themselves or that all parents want to be their kid's friends, I have to respond.

posted by cjets at 04:34 PM on July 23

You may call me Johann Gambolputty de von Ausfern-Schplenden-Schlitter-Crasscrenbon-Fried-Digger-Dingle-Dangle-Dongle-Dungle-Burstein-von-Knacker-Thrasher-Apple-Banger-Horowitz-Ticolensic-Grander-Knotty-Spelltinkle-Grandlich-Grumblemeyer-Spelterwasser-Kurstlich-Himbleeisen-Bahnwagen-Gutenabend-Bitte-ein-Nurnburger-Bratwustle-Gernspurten-Mitz-Weimache-Luber-Hundsfut- Gumberaber-Shonedanker-Kalbsfleisch-Mittler-Aucher von Hautkopft of Ulm.

I mean, if you must.


It might have stopped being the "gentleman's game" when John Daly was issued his tour card.

And on preview, I still would like to see which children have been negatively influenced by Tiger anymore than they have by say Transformers 2 or hockey, or football. I mean, I don't actually want to SEE them, I just want to know if this is as big a deal as folks are making it out to be. I hear or see a coach or player yell fuck on almost every MNF telecast. Not much uproar there.

And now, I should shut up because my ADD is distracting me.

posted by THX-1138 at 04:34 PM on July 23

I still would like to see which children have been negatively influenced by Tiger ... I just want to know if this is as big a deal as folks are making it out to be.

This is a straw man. Or straw child. The first mention of him being a role model was from an adult taking about following Tiger's example in how to conduct himself while golfing. The ones making that aspect of the story a big deal were the "think of the children!" people who ridicule the notion that famous people can ever be treated as role models for children.

posted by rcade at 04:46 PM on July 23

My family was like the Spanish Inquisition: Nobody expected it

So..does that also mean that your family took part in the Spanish Armada of 1588 that attempted to take down the infamous pirate, One-eyed Willie depicted in the classic film, The Goonies?

posted by BornIcon at 04:53 PM on July 23

You made a blanket statement that parents want to be their friend.. I see now that you're quickly backtracking by saying "some" parents want to be their kid's friend.

I wasn't backtracking at all because if you assumed that I said that ALL parents want to befriend their children then that is your error since I never wrote that.

Of course, not every parent is a shitty or perfect parent but to make it seem as if what Tiger does on a golf course when he loses his cool is something your child shouldn't have to witness is ridiculous. Those same parents are probably the same ones that look at Tiger in disgust with his behaviour but then turn around and change the channel to Spongebob Squarepants so that their child is entertained....and out of their hair for at least a half an hour.

posted by BornIcon at 05:07 PM on July 23

Here's what you originally wrote above:

Instead of being a parent to their children, parents want to be their friend.

You didn't say "some" parents, you said "parents." Without qualifying the word "parents," you are implying that all parents want to be their friend.

Those same parents are probably the same ones that look at Tiger in disgust with his behaviour but then turn around and change the channel to Spongebob Squarepants so that their child is entertained....and out of their hair for at least a half an hour.

Once again with your inane, incorrect and unsupported generalizations. Thanks so much for your input.

posted by cjets at 05:33 PM on July 23

Yes, Tommy "Thunder" Bolt was an angry man on the course, but he's not one of the all time greats.

Quote from Tommys 'World Golf Hall of Fame' page:

Ben Hogan firmly believed had Bolt only been able to mask his emotions better and accept failure, his record would have been even better. "If we could've screwed another head on his shoulders, Tommy Bolt could have been the greatest who ever played," Hogan once said.

I believe that Tiger is smart enough (and image conscius enough) that if he percieves that this lil' habit of expressing himself sourly is seen as some as a bad thing, he will change it. And maybe he will mature enough to realize that another of Hogan's sayings are true:

"Golf is not a game of good shots. It's a game of bad shots."

posted by mjkredliner at 06:50 PM on July 23

Once again with your inane, incorrect and unsupported generalizations. Thanks so much for your input

Don't get upset that you're that only one that even thought that I said ALL parents and also that you probably saw yourself in that analogy. It is what it is.

posted by BornIcon at 03:56 PM on July 28

Once again with your inane, incorrect and unsupported generalizations. Thanks so much for your input

Don't get upset that you're that only one that even thought that I said ALL parents and also that you probably saw yourself in that analogy. It is what it is.

You know, at first I felt bad about being a little harsh with my comment above. But then I realized that sooner or later you would be back with another idiotic comment fully justifying my harsh response.

Thanks again for not disappointing me.

posted by cjets at 12:46 AM on July 30

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